Cabin Crew Career Advice http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice Keep up to date with our latest articles on career advice in the airline industry. Cabin Crew Salaries, Contracts and Benefits Explained. http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/cabin-crew-salaries-contracts-and-benefits-explained/1187 cabincrew.com Mon, 20 Apr 2015 12:12:15 GMT <img src="http://cabincrewexcellence.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/CCCblogxx.004-300x225.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <strong><u>The Contract</u></strong><br /> <br /> Before offering a working contract, most airlines will seek references potentially going back 3 – 5 years, so make sure you have strong individuals in good professional positions who can vouch for you. You will also need to pass your medical exam with a doctor or clinic nominated by the airline as well as your initial training, usually 4 to 7 weeks long.<br /> <br /> Your working contract as a new starter can be between 6 months to 2 years, however if you are working for an airline who has relocated you abroad, they will most likely have the strongest intentions to keep you indefinitely since you are an investment for the airline. <br /> <br /> As part of the contract, you will have a probationary period to complete before the employment agreement is set in stone. Probationary periods tend to be 3 to 6 months long.<br /> <br /> <img src="http://cabincrewexcellence.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/CCCblogxx.008-300x225.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <strong><u>The Salary</u></strong><br /> <br /> Starting package for new cabin crew is approximately $24,000 per annum. The full package can include other financial benefits, besides the basic salary, such as:<br /> <br /> -Per Diem (a daily meal allowance generally paid when crew lay over in other cities than their home base)<br /> -Pay per block hour (a set rate paid to cabin crew for each flying hour)<br /> -Inflight sale commissions (percentage from the inflight duty-free sales)<br /> <br /> The Per Diem for commercial cabin crew differs depending on the cost of living in the destination they are flying to. Because it is supposed to cover their meal expenses when away from base, it is generally higher in Europe, USA, Japan or Russia and lower in Southeast Asian countries.<br /> <br /> If you consider joining one of the major airlines in the Middle East or the Gulf region (Qatar Airways, Emirates Airlines, Etihad, Saudia Airlines), your package will include additional benefits like free medical insurance, free transportation for work-related duties or free accommodation in the country of the airline’s home base. The average earnings of junior cabin crew flying for these airlines are:<br /> <br /> -Qatar Airways: basic $1000 + per diem (on layovers) + block hour pay<br /> -Emirates Airlines: basic $1100 + per diem (when flying) + block hour pay<br /> -Etihad: basic $900 + per diem (on layovers) + block hour pay<br /> -Saudia Airlines: basic $850 + per diem (on layovers) + block hour pay<br /> <br /> Once you get your wings and have flown for at least a couple of years, you can move up the ranks depending on your performance and the rate of the airline’s business growth.Senior commercial cabin crew starting salary can reach $35,000 per annum and if you are fortunate enough to progress to VIP or Corporate Cabin Crew, packages can exceed $70,000 per annum.<br /> <br /> In addition, VIP cabin crew can get up to 50% more time off than commercial airline crewmembers as the schedule for the private sector is on a rotation basis. Most VIP operators understand that a happy workforce is an efficient workforce and that the high level of dedication and effort provided by a VIP cabin crew can only be sustained for limited periods of time without reward. VIP cabin crew tend to have patterns of 2-months work/1-month off or even 1-month work/1-month off.<br /> <br /> <strong>Uniforms</strong>: Most airlines will pay for your uniforms, however some airlines might expect you to cover the cost of the uniform, which will be deducted from your salary in small monthly installments.<br /> <br /> <strong>Commissions</strong>: Some airlines will pay their cabin crew attractive commissions for any food & beverage (applicable in low cost airlines) or duty free products sold in-flight. This is an added bonus that motivates crew to sell more, a win-win situation for both the cabin crew and the airline.<br /> <br /> <strong>Languages</strong>: If you are considering applying for a European commercial airline, it is good to know that most major carriers (Lufthansa, KLM, Swissair, etc.) require their cabin crew to speak the national language of the airline or even to be a legal resident of the country the airline is based in.<br /> <br /> Airlines in the Middle East require the applicants to have a strong knowledge of English, with any additional language being considered an advantage.<br /> <br /> Furthermore, airlines in the Middle East sometimes offer a separate allowance for cabin crews who can speak other languages besides English. In addition, you might get assigned to operate flights as a language speaker to the country whose language you speak (e.g. if you speak Italian, you will most likely find yourself going to Italy quite often).<br /> <br /> <img src="http://cabincrewexcellence.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/CCCblogxx.002-300x225.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <strong><u>The Benefits</u></strong><br /> <br /> Here are some of the most common benefits you can look forward to:<br /> <br /> -You get to travel the world while being paid for it<br /> -Tax-free salary<br /> -Discounted airline tickets for yourself, your family and friends<br /> -International medical insurance<br /> -Paid annual vacation<br /> -Maternity leave (depending on each airline’s policy)<br /> -Free accommodation and transportation or allowances to cover the costs<br /> -Discount on Duty Free products in major airports across the world<br /> <br /> <strong>Being involved in this profession for so many years, we can say it is just as packed with challenges as it is with rewards and opportunities. If you do it long enough, it becomes more than a job, it opens your horizons wider than any other job we can think of and offers great opportunities for career progression, especially if you work for one of the leading airlines of the world. If you have the smallest seed of desire to pursue this profession we have just one piece of advice for you: GO FOR IT!</strong><br /> <br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> Monica & Simona started their flying careers at one of the major airlines in the Gulf region. After flying for over 6 years as commercial cabin crews, they moved on to flying for different reputable VIP operators in the Middle East and Europe and have gradually progressed to the role of VIP Cabin Crew Director and VIP Cabin Crew Trainer respectively.<br /> <br /> They are the two co-founders of Cabin Crew Excellence, an online platform dedicated to individuals of all aviation experience levels. Our aim is to help people from all over the world enter the wonderful field of aviation, assist existing cabin crew to transition to VIP operations and empower cabin crew of all levels to further enhance their job-related knowledge and skills and invest in their personal and professional development.<br /> <br /> If you’re interested in becoming Cabin Crew, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com">www.cabincrewexcellence.com</a> have a range of video tutorials, e-books, workbooks, short manuals and extensive tools and resources available for all those driven by passion and aiming to achieve excellence in the field. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com/online-cabin-crew-interview-training-intro-video/">FREE Online Cabin Crew Interview Training Video & Ebook</a><br /> <br /> If you’re already Cabin Crew or VIP Cabin Crew, we have a wealth of resources you will find useful for personal and professional development. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewexcellence.com/vip-cabin-crew-job-recruitment-seminar/">VIP Cabin Crew Seminar Video</a> VIP Cabin Crew | Participating at an Airshow http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/vip-cabin-crew-participating-at-an-airshow/1186 cabincrew.com Mon, 09 Mar 2015 12:33:12 GMT It could also happen that your company can decide to rent an exhibition stand (indoors) or a chalet (outdoors, usually right in front of the aircraft parking position) to gain more exposure and have more space for business meetings.<br /> <br /> This is where you come in. Cabin crews working on the aircraft usually accompany it to the event and showcase the cabin with all its features or assist with on-stand or chalet service.<br /> <br /> The aircraft will either be open to visitors (rarely) or will be accessed only with invitations by prospective clients that are interested to charter or even buy a similar plane. Business meetings will often take place on board as well.<br /> <br /> You will be expected to look your usual best in the company uniform, have a solid knowledge of the aircraft features (how long it can fly non-stop, passenger capacity, baggage hold capacity, inflight entertainment system, etc.) decorate the cabin/stand/chalet as discreetly yet as VIP as possible (prepare a full table lay-up, have flower and/or chocolate arrangements displayed in the cabin, etc.), look after the visitors (offer drinks, canapés, tidy up the cabin regularly, empty ashtrays and dust bins, etc.) and much more.<br /> <br /> In between the visits/meetings, you need to be fast in sweeping every section of the cabin and make sure that it is looking impeccable for every single visitor.<br /> <br /> The catering supplied daily (drinks, canapés, finger food, etc.) might have to be arranged by you or by the aircraft manufacturer’s representative. This information will be communicated to you, one or two days in advance, by the Sales Department of your company.<br /> <br /> If it is organized by the manufacturer’s representative, communicate closely with them to see if your assistance is needed. You might have to take care of the dish washing at the end of the day and will need to know where you can do that. If your aircraft is equipped with a proper sink or even a dishwasher, the problem is solved. Otherwise, you will have to organize equipment pick up with the company designated to provide catering.<br /> <br /> If you have to organize catering yourself, try to find out if there is an exclusive provider agreed by the event organizers. Almost every time, there is only one exclusive caterer that must be used by all exhibitors and that isn’t necessarily the provider based in the airport where the event takes place. It can be a 5 star hotel or a private caterer from outside that particular airport.<br /> <br /> It is important for you to have these details because the beginning and the end of an event day are the busiest times for the caterer. If you are just finding out these details at the end of the first day, it is already late and you will end up waiting for hours until the caterer finishes servicing other exhibitors before attending to your needs.<br /> <br /> Also find out from the manufacturer’s representative the approximate number of persons you are expected to receive on board/in the chalet so you can compile your catering order efficiently.<br /> <br /> Airshows are very dynamic events for all participants, and especially for cabin crew. We strongly recommend that you carry a pair of flat shoes and have it handy so you can change from your high heels every now and then even for a few moments at a time. It will make a difference in the long run.<br /> <br /> You will be on your feet non stop and if you are in high heels the whole time, by the end of the first day you will be ready to chop your feet off if that made the ache go away.<br /> <br /> Have your make up kit handy and replenish your make-up often. Just like during your normal duty day, you need to look as fresh and attractive at the end of each day as you looked at the beginning of it.<br /> <br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> <i>Monica & Simona started their flying careers at one of the major airlines in the Gulf region. After flying for over 6 years as commercial cabin crews, they moved on to flying for different reputable VIP operators in the Middle East and Europe and have gradually progressed to the role of VIP Cabin Crew Director and VIP Cabin Crew Trainer respectively.<br /> <br /> They are the two co-founders of Cabin Crew Excellence, an online platform dedicated to individuals of all aviation experience levels. Our aim is to help people from all over the world enter the wonderful field of aviation, assist existing cabin crew to transition to VIP operations and empower cabin crew of all levels to further enhance their job-related knowledge and skills and invest in their personal and professional development.<br /> <br /> If you’re interested in becoming Cabin Crew, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com">www.cabincrewexcellence.com</a> have a range of video tutorials, e-books, workbooks, short manuals and extensive tools and resources available for all those driven by passion and aiming to achieve excellence in the field. FREE Online Cabin Crew Interview Training Video & Ebook<br /> <br /> If you’re already Cabin Crew or VIP Cabin Crew, we have a wealth of resources you will find useful for personal and professional development</i> VIP Cabin Crew | Practical Assessment Guide http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/vip-cabin-crew-practical-assessment-guide/1183 cabincrew.com Mon, 09 Mar 2015 12:00:35 GMT If you are scheduled to interview with a private airline for a VIP cabin crew role, you might be asked to undergo a practical assessment during the face-to-face interview.<br /> <br /> The tasks are different depending on the company and can include (to name a few):<br /> <br /> <b>-Doing a table lay-up for a minimum of 2 VIPs<br /> -Opening a (dummy) bottle of wine in front of the VIP and demonstrating (or at least explaining) wine service etiquette<br /> -Simulating a dialogue with a high ranking VIP (like a royal family member or a head of state)<br /> -It is important that you remain calm and composed throughout the interview, and especially during the practical assessment.</b><br /> <br /> Nervousness can easily be sensed in a candidate’s voice, facial expression and overall body language. During practical assessments, it is that much more obvious as hands can get shaky and that can ruin your demonstration.<br /> <br /> We recommend that you do your best to imagine you are already in your VIP cabin crew job and are serving a VIP. You are in your workspace and are fully confident with what you are doing; so own it without being nervous!<br /> <br /> If you are asked to do a table lay-up, take a second to scan the items provided for the task and use them all. If you have a silver tray and a tray liner, line your tray and neatly organize on it all the lay up items for at least 2 passengers at once. If you don’t have a service tray, organize all your lay-up items on a main course plate (if available) and use that as your tray.<br /> <br /> You might also want to ask what type of service you are expected to layup for before getting started. If you are laying up for silver service, your appetizer and main course plates must be included in the lay-up. Do the lay-up for each passenger and only move on to the next when you are completely done with the first. Your aim is to minimize movement in front or around each passenger as much as possible.<br /> <br /> <b>Casual Setting</b><br /> <br /> Pay attention to symmetry as you go and make sure each layup mirrors the previous one perfectly. You need to be very observant for that because moving the silverware, chinaware or glassware once they have been set on the table is a No Go!<br /> <br /> The recruiter might try to engage you in discussion while you are doing the layup. Stay focused on both tasks and don’t loose sight of the final look of your table, which must be perfect! If the practical assessment task is to make a dialogue with a high-ranking VIP, you need to be aware of the correct title to address him/her with and the formal protocols relevant to the VIP’s rank.<br /> <br /> Dealing with very high-ranking individuals can be very intimidating, even stressful. Many recruiters will try to push your limits to understand what is your threshold. You must remain professional, graceful and think on your feet throughout the interview. Be a good listener, irrespective of the scenario presented, and take a few seconds to think twice before reacting to any situation. Do your research before the interview so you can understand the type of operation your prospective employer is running. The types of aircraft operated, whether it is a charter or owner-only company or any insight from a fellow crew-member already flying with this airline would all be very useful in making sure your pre-interview preparation is as thorough as possible.<br /> <br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> <i>Monica & Simona started their flying careers at one of the major airlines in the Gulf region. After flying for over 6 years as commercial cabin crews, they moved on to flying for different reputable VIP operators in the Middle East and Europe and have gradually progressed to the role of VIP Cabin Crew Director and VIP Cabin Crew Trainer respectively.<br /> <br /> They are the two co-founders of Cabin Crew Excellence, an online platform dedicated to individuals of all aviation experience levels. Our aim is to help people from all over the world enter the wonderful field of aviation, assist existing cabin crew to transition to VIP operations and empower cabin crew of all levels to further enhance their job-related knowledge and skills and invest in their personal and professional development.<br /> <br /> If you’re interested in becoming Cabin Crew, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com">www.cabincrewexcellence.com</a> have a range of video tutorials, e-books, workbooks, short manuals and extensive tools and resources available for all those driven by passion and aiming to achieve excellence in the field. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com/online-cabin-crew-interview-training-intro-video/">FREE Online Cabin Crew Interview Training Video & Ebook</a><br /> <br /> If you’re already Cabin Crew or VIP Cabin Crew, we have a wealth of resources you will find useful for personal and professional development.</i> Frellancing: An Alternative for Cabin Crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/frellancing-an-alternative-for-cabin-crew/1182 cabincrew.com Wed, 04 Mar 2015 11:56:33 GMT <a href="/images/career-advice/aa9ca478e206cf49_l.jpg"><img src="/images/career-advice/aa9ca478e206cf49.jpg" /></a><br /> <br /> The biggest advantages of being a freelancing VIP cabin crew would have to be the freedom of choice when it comes to flight duties and the considerable amount of time off gained.<br /> <br /> <b>Is Freelancing For You?</b><br /> <br /> When freelancing, you pretty much work when you want without being tied to an aircraft, a roster or an employing company because assignments come one at a time and you can always say you are not available if offered a trip you wouldn’t be happy to go on.<br /> <br /> <b>The financial benefits are also substantial:</b> a freelancing VIP cabin crew earning anywhere between $150 to $450 per day, the exact amount depending on your experience and the number/types of aircraft you are certified on. Crew that have experience working on their own on small aircraft tend to get offered the higher rate; the reason for that criteria will become clear as you continue to read through this article. <br /> The daily rate is however the only actual payment that you get (along with your hotel and work-related transportation being paid by the company throughout the assignment).<br /> The responsibility of your medical insurance and recurrent training will have to be bared and paid for by yourself. This is an important aspect to remember, as most companies hiring freelancers require that you are certified and still current on the type of aircraft you will be covering duty on.<br /> <br /> <b>When called up for an assignment, the notice time can be anywhere from a couple of days to as little as 1 or 2 hours before the flight.</b><br /> <br /> The ideal notice period is at least 24 hours; that gives you enough time to get familiar with the company requirements, the VIP profile, the aircraft lay-out, etc. as well as prepare everything you will need for the flight (catering, specific VIP preferences, flowers, chocolate, etc.). If you are offered an assignment for a bigger aircraft (Airbus/BBJ), your work is considerably simplified because you will be part of a team of crew and will be briefed on your exact responsibilities on board by the person in charge.<br /> For single-crew operations however, the challenge is at its highest because you become responsible for organising every aspect of the flight rather than being just another helping hand.<br /> <br /> Preparation and confidence in your abilities is key. You need to be aware of:<br /> <br /> -Aircraft type and configuration<br /> -Available kitchen appliances (microwave, kettle, fridge, coffee machine, etc.)<br /> -Available food storage space<br /> <br /> <b>Thinking on your feet is extremely important</b>, especially when given only a few hours to prepare for a flight. You might be in a new country, working on a new aircraft you haven’t seen before and with passengers you know nothing about.<br /> <br /> Having all your resources ready (bag always packed, catering provider details handy, a draft order for the maximum number of pax ready to be sent, etc.) will keep you one step ahead in your flight prep. Traveling the world continues to remain one of the big motivations for freelancing cabin crew as you get different owners, many going to remote destinations or very exotic ones, where you tend to stay for days, sometimes weeks on end.<br /> <br /> Every single day is different in private aviation in general but even more so for freelancing crews.<br /> <br /> On the flip side, freelancing assignments aren’t stable and it is quite difficult to anticipate an approximate monthly income. It is an on again off again thing and it could happen that you get a long trip which will bring you a handsome income, followed by weeks of quiet periods. If you have another project keeping you busy, freelancing is definitely a good plan for additional income.<br /> <br /> <b>How to get Started Freelancing</b><br /> <br /> When it comes to finding freelancing opportunities, it’s all about word of mouth. It is important to keep in touch with old colleagues or register with recruitment companies that place freelancing VIP cabin crew as well. Business networks such as LinkedIn are also a good way to gain exposure and let the industry know you are available for this purpose.Make sure you get some sort of contract/agreement for every single assignment, whether 1 day or one month long!<br /> <br /> Plans change very often in private aviation and you wouldn’t want to commit to an assignment only to end up in an extended trip, with a daily rate different than the one agreed on initially or even working for free altogether. Some VIP operators offer freelancing contracts for a determined period (6 months / one year). Crews just need to fill in the dates of the respective month with their availability.<br /> <br /> Freelancing as a VIP Cabin crew is definitely challenging but also extremely rewarding and as ever, it's up to you to decide whether it might work for you or not!<br /> <br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> Monica & Simona started their flying careers at one of the major airlines in the Gulf region. After flying for over 6 years as commercial cabin crews, they moved on to flying for different reputable VIP operators in the Middle East and Europe and have gradually progressed to the role of VIP Cabin Crew Director and VIP Cabin Crew Trainer respectively.<br /> <br /> They are the two co-founders of Cabin Crew Excellence, an online platform dedicated to individuals of all aviation experience levels. Our aim is to help people from all over the world enter the wonderful field of aviation, assist existing cabin crew to transition to VIP operations and empower cabin crew of all levels to further enhance their job-related knowledge and skills and invest in their personal and professional development.<br /> <br /> If you’re interested in becoming Cabin Crew, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com">www.cabincrewexcellence.com</a> have a range of video tutorials, e-books, workbooks, short manuals and extensive tools and resources available for all those driven by passion and aiming to achieve excellence in the field. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewexcellence.com/online-cabin-crew-interview-training-intro-video/">FREE Online Cabin Crew Interview Training Video & Ebook</a><br /> <br /> If you’re already Cabin Crew or VIP Cabin Crew, we have a wealth of resources you will find useful for personal and professional development. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com/vip-cabin-crew-job-recruitment-seminar/">VIP Cabin Crew Seminar Video</a> How to Become VIP Cabin Crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/how-to-become-vip-cabin-crew/1181 cabincrew.com Wed, 04 Mar 2015 11:27:06 GMT <a href="/images/career-advice/aab6cf8071a7f309_l.jpg"><img src="/images/career-advice/aab6cf8071a7f309.jpg" /></a><br /> <br /> <br /> The perks offered by a VIP cabin crew role tempt even the most airline-loyal commercial crews and include:<br /> <br /> <B>-Up to 100% higher monthly income (most VIP cabin crew take home over $70,000 per year)<br /> -Up to 50% more time off than commercial cabin crew(possibly up to 70% if working on rotation basis)<br /> -More free tickets to the crew’s home country (for rotation-based contracts)<br /> -The privilege of working for/with some of the world’s highest ranking individuals (celebrities, royal family members, etc.)<br /> -Traveling to more remote, unique destinations with longer lay-overs (sometimes weeks-long)</B><br /> <br /> The environment is different, the passenger load is less, the glamour factor is actually real and our aircraft fly farther, faster and higher, literally.<br /> <br /> When you consider the financial rewards alone, everybody wants in. It isn’t unheard of that crew take home not only their monthly income but also substantial signs of appreciation from their more generous VIPs.<br /> <br /> On the flip side, the employers’ expectations are high, the recruiters are extremely selective and the difficulty to break through these barriers is real.<br /> <br /> So how do you get there? How do you break into the highly lucrative, very prestigious field of VIP aviation?<br /> <br /> The general requirements are:<br /> <br /> <B>-Up to 35 years of age<br /> -Minimum height 165 cm and weight in proportion with height<br /> -Previous VIP experience<br /> -Strong knowledge of official protocols<br /> -Impeccable portfolio (CV and photos)<br /> -Impeccably groomed<br /> -Very discreet person<br /> -Complete flexibility<br /> -Creativity and personal accountability<br /> -Highly developed organizational skills</B><br /> <br /> Some of the requirements are set in stone (e.g. personal presentation and demeanour, discretion, height/weight, etc.) however some might leave room for compromise between the recruiters and the applicants (yourself).<br /> <br /> When it comes to experience however, if nobody hires you, how are you going to gain that experience?<br /> <br /> First you have to remember that every VIP cabin crew was once a commercial airline cabin crew. The industry is open for anybody who’s ambitious enough to pursue it.<br /> <br /> Getting into the private aviation sector takes a whole lot of individual study, a good network to expose your portfolio through and a little bit of luck.<br /> <br /> According to statistics, 1 in 100 cabin crew applying for a role with a VIP operator actually end up getting the job.<br /> <br /> Staying updated with all the active job offers as well as knowing the exact requirements for each is essential to sending your application out and through the right channels.<br /> <br /> Our advice? Invest in your industry-relevant knowledge as much as possible so you can appear in front of recruiters with 100% confidence.<br /> <br /> This will not only show a great deal of initiative and determination on your side, but the recruiters will be happy to be presented with a ready-to-go candidate like yourself that needs little to no time dedicated to ground and on-the-job training.<br /> <br /> Follow up with the current vacancies and apply consistently.<br /> <br /> Expand your network and try getting in touch with cabin crew that are active in the field and might be willing to give you additional insight on how to present yourself at the interview.<br /> <br /> Most importantly, never give up! You can’t loose if you don’t give up.<br /> <br /> So remain consistent and follow your dream and you will, without a doubt, reach your goal sooner rather than later.<br /> <br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> <i>Monica & Simona started their flying careers at one of the major airlines in the Gulf region. After flying for over 6 years as commercial cabin crews, they moved on to flying for different reputable VIP operators in the Middle East and Europe and have gradually progressed to the role of VIP Cabin Crew Director and VIP Cabin Crew Trainer respectively.<br /> <br /> They are the two co-founders of Cabin Crew Excellence, an online platform dedicated to individuals of all aviation experience levels. Our aim is to help people from all over the world enter the wonderful field of aviation, assist existing cabin crew to transition to VIP operations and empower cabin crew of all levels to further enhance their job-related knowledge and skills and invest in their personal and professional development.<br /> <br /> If you’re interested in becoming VIP Cabin Crew, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewexcellence.com">www.cabincrewexcellence.com</a> have a range of video tutorials, e-books, workbooks, short manuals and extensive tools and resources available for all those driven by passion and aiming to achieve excellence in the field.<br /> <br /> If you’re already Cabin Crew or VIP Cabin Crew, we have a wealth of resources you will find useful for personal and professional development</i> What next? Life after cabin crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-next-life-after-cabin-crew/1166 cabincrew.com Wed, 08 Oct 2014 11:39:08 GMT The role of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a> has so many facets and we do collect a lot of skills during our career – not just things like problem solving and people skills but also first aid, languages and an understanding of different cultures. We gain many skills that are transferable to many different roles back in the corporate world.<br /> <br /> Of course, some cabin crew leave to start a family or grow tired of the job itself or sometimes, a contract ends or you get made redundant. In today’s difficult economic climate, our jobs are less stable which makes it even more important to make a wise decision regarding your future career. One of the most difficult things to deal with is that the job becomes a lifestyle and it is very hard to settle back down to the world of 9 to 5. But there are lots of options to bridge the gap between leaving cabin crew and starting a new career.<br /> <br /> <strong>Other opportunities with airlines and airports</strong><br /> <br /> There are prospects within the airlines of course and you can take a side step into becoming a trainer or recruiter. Or you may want to look at an office based position or work as a base supervisor or crew scheduler/administrator. If you still want to fly but need a new environment and don’t have commitments it is worth either moving abroad for a role or trying your hand at flying on private jets in corporate aviation. Within corporate aviation, you could also move up to chief flight attendant or crew manager or work in operations or as an FBO (Fixed Based Operator). Some cabin crew decide to learn to fly and work towards their pilot’s license.<br /> <br /> <strong>Jobs in the wider travel sector</strong><br /> <br /> Within travel, there are many opportunities – you could work abroad as a representative in a resort’s hotels and airport or work as ground staff at the local airport. Working in the VIP airline lounges has become an attractive option. In some countries, you can work as a train steward or retrain to be a tourist guide. If you are interested in travel and teaching, taking a TEFL qualification may be a good idea – you can teach English to students almost anywhere in the world.<br /> <br /> <strong>Going corporate</strong><br /> <br /> Outside of travel and tourism, the corporate business world likes to employ ex cabin crew in high profile receptionist, personal assistant or retail roles. Some <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">crew</a> decide to retrain completely in and go into one of the caring professions, such as nursing or teaching and the paramedic role in increasingly popular. Joining the police force has also been an option for cabin crew looking for something with more stability.<br /> <br /> One thing to be aware of is that many ex cabin crew miss flying so much, that they return after a few years. It is possible to return after a break and some airlines like to take on cabin crew who have some flying experience. So, whatever you decide to do once you decide to take a break from flying, know that there are still opportunities and you can use your skills and knowledge gained whilst flying. <br /> <br /> You may also choose to study whilst you are still flying to broaden your horizons, many cabin crew do. You could be encouraged by your travels to move to another country and do something new or be cabin crew again and of course if you have language skills, this will always be an advantage in any future profession. So is being cabin crew a dead end career? No, it is just the beginning…<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author:</strong> <br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. <br /> <br /> More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">a series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. Is it still safe to fly as Cabin Crew? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/is-it-still-safe-to-fly-as-cabin-crew/1165 cabincrew.com Wed, 03 Sep 2014 12:38:44 GMT Primarily, the answer is yes, but you do need to be aware of the hazards as well as putting them in perspective.<br /> <br /> <strong>Sickness</strong><br /> <br /> This is one of the biggest problems for <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">Cabin Crew</a> as we have to relatively fit to do our job and being off sick is often frowned upon. We do get vulnerable to colds and flu, especially when fatigued and maybe eating at different times of the day and night. Over the years the links between cosmic radiation and the risk of getting cancer has always been there and that’s a chance we have to take, it is probably no more a risk than most jobs. <br /> <br /> We should take precautionary measures in order to take care of ourselves in certain areas of the world to avoid things like malaria (cover up and use repellant) and things like stomach bugs (drink bottled water, don’t have ice or anything that may have been washed in unsanitary water). <br /> <br /> Every few years there seems to be a worldwide epidemic of some sort - currently the Ebola virus and mostly these things are not contractible as easily as first thought and you would have to be in very close contact with someone with the disease to catch it yourself. These topics are covered during most airline training courses and your colleagues will know the latest company advice, and also be willing to advise.<br /> <br /> <strong>Accidents</strong><br /> <br /> Accidents and unfortunate events have been major headlines recently, but it is still extremely safe to fly. It is fact, that you are more likely to get kicked to death by a donkey than be involved in such an incident. We are highly trained to do everything we can in an emergency situation and if possible have as many survivors as possible. <br /> <br /> Recent events have been unthinkable and uncontrollable, but are thankfully incredibly rare, one in billions. Remember that the most dangerous part of your journey is the drive to and from the airport, especially when fatigued, and that is fact.<br /> <br /> <strong>Political Unrest and War Zones</strong><br /> <br /> Most airlines will detract or postpone a route from their network if there is a perceived safety threat. If the situation is volatile in a city for example but safe to travel there, the airline will advise the crew of precautions to take – avoid this area, do not go out alone etc. If there has been a recent event which could endanger a crew at the airport or hotel, either the crew will fly straight back after turnaround or the route will be cancelled completely. <br /> <br /> With so many areas of unrest at the moment, many airlines are choosing to re-route away from some countries airspace entirely, which negates the potential threat of flying over areas of conflict.<br /> <br /> <strong>Down-route Safety</strong><br /> <br /> It is advisable to ask your colleagues about any down-route layovers that you are wary of as they will probably have flown there and know the drill! You have to be aware of your personal safety in some cities and you will get used to certain behaviours and know how to react to unusual situations. <br /> <br /> Things like local scams to be aware of (taxis, pickpockets etc) and situations to avoid become well known to most crews, so it important to make wise choices. <br /> Unfortunately, we are very visible and locals often know what time we get to a hotel, places we go, when we leave as we have a very visible presence (e.g. uniform) and a particular routine (a group of people, different cultures and sexes, same age range going out at the same time, for example). <br /> <br /> This can make us unfortunate ‘targets’ so it is important to be very self aware and look after your colleagues too.<br /> <br /> <strong>Job Stability </strong><br /> <br /> Job stability is slowly getting better in the aviation industry and contracts are relatively safe unless the airline goes bankrupt or never gets off the ground! If you are made redundant from a new or under-performing airline it is unlikely you will be covered in any way, so be prepared for a change of career or have back up funds if you think there may be difficult times ahead. <br /> <br /> Wages for Cabin Crew are not increasing at the current time and salary is variable, so for someone who needs a regular stable income and is thinking of leaving a good job, being Cabin Crew may not be an option, without the right back up plan.<br /> <br /> <strong>On a Bright Note…</strong><br /> <br /> For anyone thinking about the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">Cabin Crew role</a> and is concerned about the risks, put things in to perspective and think about the big picture, it isn’t all doom and gloom. Is this ‘risk’ big enough for you to lose the opportunity of a lifetime? How much do you want the job? <br /> <br /> Do you have a back up plan if things don’t work out as you hoped? Think about it and calculate the negatives and positives… the biggest risk of all, is that you may love the Cabin Crew job so much, that you never want to leave or you resign from a position as Cabin Crew and then miss it all the more and want to return to flying.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the Author </strong><br /> <br /> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Patricia Green</a> has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. <br /> <br /> More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today.<br /> <br /> Photo: Air France What are the biggest UPSIDES of becoming cabin crew? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-are-the-biggest-upsides-of-becoming-cabin-crew/1164 cabincrew.com Wed, 27 Aug 2014 09:17:48 GMT Of course firstly, the most obvious one – there is no 9 to 5 and your day will never quite be the same. You will be working with different crew members and passengers, on different aircraft to another destination, so you won’t feel the normal day to day grind. Eventually, when you settle in to your <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">Cabin Crew role </a>it will become more like a ‘lifestyle’ and you will get used to scheduling work and life together and it will seem less like work as you adjust. <br /> <br /> A warning though – the job can become addictive and it is hard to adjust to life back in the normal world. Once you have been Cabin Crew it is quite difficult to do anything else…<br /> <br /> <strong>Great hotels and sightseeing</strong><br /> <br /> Many people at their Cabin Crew assessment day tell the recruiter they want to travel the world. Yes it’s a cliché, but depending on the airline it is possible! If you get to work for a large international airline, the chances are that you will be flying and having layovers all over the world. <br /> <br /> You might not have much time down-route but you do get used to adjusting time zones and getting enough time for sleep and shopping and hopefully a little sightseeing. We also get to stay in some great hotels too, usually 4 or 5 Star with transport to and from the airport. Hotels often offer discounts on food and internet and sometimes spa treatments, so it does make your stay abroad a whole lot easier and more affordable.<br /> <br /> <strong>Discounted travel tickets </strong><br /> <br /> You may also be offered the benefit of staff travel, where you can receive discounted airline tickets for your friends and family. This is probably one of the most attractive perks of becoming Cabin Crew, although you may not use many yourself - as the last thing you may want to do on your time off is fly! But it is a very helpful benefit for your annual holidays and if you wish to commute in the future.<br /> <br /> <strong>Pay and promotion opportunities </strong><br /> <br /> Your monthly salary may be initially low, but will build up over time with flying hours, commission, layover allowances etc. Once you start to get promoted to business or first class and to purser level, once again you will be rewarded. Although a varied income, it will be on time and reliable. Contracts can be anywhere between 6 months and 3 years and sometimes extendable, so you can work out if this is the right career move for you and whether you wish to fly as a seasonal recruit or as a permanent career.<br /> <br /> <strong>Uniform and other benefits </strong><br /> <br /> Of course a smart uniform (and if you are lucky a designer one!) is a nice advantage, making you feel proud of your personal presentation and being the face of the airline. This also encourages you to take pride in your work and enjoy it. Most airlines offer benefits such as life and health insurance and pension schemes. Some airline staff also get local discounts for things like gym membership and hotel discounts, so it is always worth checking, once you have your crew ID.<br /> <br /> <strong>Friends for life </strong><br /> <br /> You will meet so many new people, everyday with new passengers and crew. Your passengers could be anyone from your auntie to a VIP or celebrity, who knows who you will meet and every Cabin Crew has a story! With your fellow Cabin Crew you will make some very special friends and some will last a lifetime – there is something about Cabin Crew and the way we understand the lifestyle that makes us excellent friends even if we are away a lot flying and not always contactable. You know who you can trust, maybe it is the empathetic nature we have and as Cabin Crew we are quite a sociable lot who love to talk, especially about work!<br /> <br /> <strong>Accommodation benefits in the Middle East</strong><br /> <br /> You may also find that working in the Middle East will provide you with more benefits and added extras – so if you can stand a culture shock, it may be well worth relocating. Many airlines in this region will offer you free and secure company accommodation, with most utilities paid (except for internet and phone usually) and sometimes they even provide facilities such as tennis courts, a gym and swimming pool. You will also have free transport to and from the airport and some shuttle services maybe available to local shopping areas and head office. <br /> <br /> Local establishments may offer discounts on everything from meals to clothing and nights out, so it is well worth carrying your ID at all times. You salary will probably be tax free too and with a set 3 year contract in most cases, it can be a good move for many new and experienced Cabin Crew.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. <br /> <br /> More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying.<br /> <br /> In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: Swissair 10 Winning Tips for Passing the Cabin Crew Assessment Day http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/10-winning-tips-for-passing-the-cabin-crew-assessment-day/1163 cabincrew.com Tue, 29 Jul 2014 14:05:29 GMT The recruiters will check if you have the right knowledge and skills to be cabin crew and be watching you closely throughout the day. Luckily, for the majority of airlines the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew </a> tests are very similar (although they are all looking for something slightly different…) so once you have attended a few, you can eventually work out your own personal formula to get through each stage. <br /> <br /> <strong>1# Reach Test </strong>– You must be able to reach up to a marker of 210/212 cm depending on the airline. This is to prove that you can reach the emergency equipment onboard the aircraft. You can stand on tip-toes (without shoes) and must be able to reach the marker with your fingertips. Tip – Mark a point on a wall at home and try to reach it (many people don’t even know they cannot reach it!) and if it is difficult, it is advisable to keep practising until you can. This is the first crucial stage of the assessment – fail this and you will go no further.<br /> <br /> <strong>2# Maths Test</strong> – Some airlines do have basic Maths tests for you to complete. This will include questions related to the cabin crew role such as having a passenger count onboard and working out how many spare seats are left or working out how many trays are in a meal cart. You will also get a question on in-flight retail working out how much a passenger has spent and what change you should give him. You may also be asked to perform a currency exchange (the rate will be given and you may be allowed to use a calculator) for example, from Pounds to Euros.<br /> <br /> <strong>3# English Test</strong> – For airlines in the Middle East, you will be asked to complete an English test – this is because English is the official language used on board in aviation (it is equivalent to ICAO level 4). You will read a passage, such as ‘A day in the life of cabin crew’ and then answer the questions that follow, to check your understanding. You may be asked to write a postcard or short essay about a subject e.g. ‘If I ruled the world’ or ‘Who is the person who inspires me most?’ You may also be asked some multiple choice questions to test your understanding of the meaning of words – you have to choose the word that has a similar meaning.<br /> <br /> <strong>4# Alternative Language Test </strong>– If you are fluent in another language, you will be tested by speaking to a native language speaker who is also cabin crew to test your fluency and ability to communicate. You need to be able to read public announcements onboard in your alternate language and also deal with passenger issues onboard. A good guide to follow is in a medical emergency. Could you translate effectively between a sick passenger and the cabin crew?<br /> <br /> <strong>5# General Knowledge Test</strong> - Some airlines like to test for things like countries, capitals and language spoken. More likely though, is that they will ask for airport codes, currencies and the phonetic alphabet. Destinations that the airline flies to and the airlines history are worth reading up on.<br /> <br /> <strong>6# Psychometric Test </strong>– These are mostly performed pre-assessment day online and are a series of personality based questions and multiple choice answers. The key is to not think and answer the first thing that comes to your head. Time is very restricted too and you need to answer all questions.<br /> <br /> <strong>7# Presentation</strong> – You may be asked to pick an item and describe its many alternative uses e.g. a water bottle. Think outside the box! It can store water or other items, used to collect condensation to drink water or cut in half and use to drink/eat out of, move soil or protect plants, send a message etc.<br /> <br /> <strong>8# Group Discussion</strong> - You may be asked to discuss how to sell a destination that the airline flies to. You must decide as a group which key features should be used in an advertisement. E.g. Paris – suitable for honeymoons, short breaks and is a foodie capital. It is the city of love and lights and offers many famous landmarks both historic and cultural. Remember to try and use the airlines motto/ideal in the advertisement somewhere.<br /> <br /> <strong>9# Group Task </strong>– An example of this would be that you are trapped as a group on a desert island. There is a life raft but only 6 people can go. You are each given a character and have to fight for your place on the life raft – who stays and who goes and why? The idea here is to work as a team, make decisions based on the facts and listen well. Do not be biased, force your opinion or overtake the task as this will be seen as a negative. It has to be about team work, communication and making decisions.<br /> <br /> <strong>10# Role Play</strong> - This will be customer service focused. You may be the manager of a hotel and your guests have arrived but there is a problem with the booking and you don’t have enough rooms. Who do you give the rooms to and why? Another option maybe dealing with a difficult passenger onboard , played by the recruiter – this can be challenging, but keep your calm and be cool headed, polite and focused and you will be fine!<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. <br /> <br /> More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. <br /> <br /> In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> <strong>Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today.</strong> <br /> <br /> Photo: Ryanair Relocating for a Cabin Crew Job http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/relocating-for-a-cabin-crew-job/1162 cabincrew.com Fri, 04 Jul 2014 09:43:57 GMT We have to factor in things like accommodation and transport costs and whether we can earn enough to keep paying a mortgage and renting a room for example. Or is it better to take a tax free salary and send money home? Are there any cultural or religious aspects to consider in a move abroad? There is a great deal to consider when we apply for a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">Cabin Crew job</a> and matching it with real life issues.<br /> <br /> With an EU passport it allows greater freedom of movement and more work opportunities, so in theory we can live and work almost anywhere within the EU. In the UK, you can apply for a work visa if you meet the requirements and have the appropriate education and experience for the role. For the USA, you do need sponsorship from the airline or a ‘green card’. Some countries such as Canada, Australia and New Zealand work on a points system to see if you qualify to work in their country. In the Middle East, work visas are provided to most nationalities on the agreement of a job offer.<br /> <br /> <strong>Coping with ‘Standby days’</strong><br /> One of the many requirements for the role (especially within the UK) is the ability to be on ‘standby’ (in case we are needed to replace another crew member at the last minute) and depending on the airline, they ask you to be able to reach the airport in 45 or 90 minutes. So, you may have to have your own transport or rent a room close to the airport base, luckily many <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">Cabin Crew</a> and Flight Crew rent rooms out to colleagues, which works out quite reasonably. Sometimes it is possible to commute if you are working long haul flights, but it is very tiring! On standby days, as a commuter you would have to book into a hotel or guest house near the airport if it is a ‘home standby’. Being at your home on your days off is a real bonus and you don’t feel like you live out of your suitcase so much.<br /> <br /> Middle East countries<br /> The idea of working in a different country may be very exciting and with paid accommodation and transport throughout the Middle East, it becomes less daunting and with all the visa processing done for you, the move is relatively easy. There are benefits such as learning about a new culture and exploring new places and receiving a tax free salary and local discounts. But will the lifestyle work for you? <br /> <br /> You will be sharing an apartment with strangers and have certain restrictions put on you regarding who can visit accommodation and when and the lifestyle can feel very restrictive. Can you adapt to the local culture and respect their wishes by dressing modestly and refraining from behavior that are normal in western life? For many older, or experienced, Cabin Crew, the culture is no issue but the restrictions can be uncomfortable, so it is worth thinking about. For younger cabin crew home sickness can feel difficult and there are some elements of culture shock.<br /> <br /> If you work in Saudi Arabia for some women this can be quite difficult – you will have to wear an abaya when in a public place and sometimes a head scarf, although for some this is quite liberating! You should also consider that you need permission to leave the country and cannot mix freely with males who are not family members. Compound life can be a little intense and it is quite difficult for a woman to go out alone. On the good side it is usually quite well paid and a relatively safe country to work in, if you abide by the rules.<br /> <br /> <strong>Keeping in touch with family</strong><br /> If you have close friends and family at home, it may feel difficult to move away knowing you won’t be able to see them for weeks or months but at least with Skype now, it makes things easier. Also you should look closely at your contract as you may not be able to leave the airline within a set time frame if it doesn’t work out and you may be required to pay a ‘bond’ or fee if leaving within a certain time. You may also not be allowed to apply or work with another airline for a year or two, so you should read things carefully. <br /> <br /> Considering relocation for your cabin crew role has so many factors – financial, personal and cultural – so it has to be a sensible decision with all the pros and cons weighed up. If problems arise – home feels like a great distance away and you have to think about how adaptable you are as a person and have a back up plan if possible.<br /> <br /> For many, working abroad is an exciting new opportunity and sometimes the way to a better life. Relocation may end up being long term and creating a whole new life in another country. You will be meeting people from all over the world and experiencing new places and maybe even learn a different language. Working in another country with lots of benefits can be perfect for some people but it doesn’t suit everyone, so make sure you make the right choice for you.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author:</strong> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/aydinphoto/">Ayudin Palabiyikaglu</a> What happens at a cabin crew pre-flight briefing? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-happens-at-a-cabin-crew-pre-flight-briefing/1161 cabincrew.com Thu, 26 Jun 2014 09:38:13 GMT A successful briefing improves communication and co-ordination during the flight as well as promoting <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/air_hostess_jobs/">cabin crew</a> teamwork, ensuring an even workload and encouraging open communication. <br /> <br /> On arrival at your base, you will check in and make sure there are no changes to your schedule and collect any safety updates or company news. If you have time, it is wise to check your cabin crew manuals for a quick reminder of safety and emergency procedures and aviation first aid.<br /> <br /> At the briefing, you will meet your senior cabin crew member (SCCM) and your fellow cabin crew for the flight. The SCCM will check with you that have your essential items: ID, passport, manuals and introduce themselves - their task is to organize the workload and make sure the cabin crew know their responsibilities.<br /> <br /> <strong>Introductions and essential information</strong><br /> <br /> They may ask everyone to introduce themselves briefly, as often you are working with people you haven’t worked with before or just worked with once or twice, so it’s good to know a little bit about one another. The SCCM will either delegate your position on the aircraft for the flight (eg. Door 1 left or R4 for example) or the most senior crew member will choose a position and then the next most senior will choose until all crew members have a working position. You will find out more about the flight including the flight time, departure and arrival time, destination and flight number and aircraft registration. <br /> <br /> Important information to remember will be given such as the passenger load, any maintenance issues, special meals (eg. vegetarian, halal, diabetic etc) and passengers who need assistance (passengers with reduced mobility or have a wheelchair). Expectations of the flight will be discussed as well as the team standards, and any aims for the day. <br /> <br /> If you are staying down-route, the SCCM will mention the hotel and destination along with any special recommendations. You may also receive a briefing sheet with all the information discussed or it is advisable to have pen and paper to hand to make notes.<br /> <br /> <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OuzAAaKSut4?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Safety and Emergency Procedures </strong><br /> <br /> You will then go through a safety and emergency procedures (SEP) scenario as a team and then be asked individual questions - for example, a potential nose gear collapse on landing and how you would prepare yourself, the cabin, and the passengers for a pre-planned emergency. You will also talk through a medical scenario, for example, a person is suffering from air sickness and then faints, what measures do you take? It is important to answer the SEP and aviation first aid questions sufficiently as if you cannot answer, you can be sent home. <br /> <br /> Your flight crew will introduce themselves and inform you of the flight time, any weather issues or expected turbulence and special instructions or unusual aspects for the flight (e.g. carriage of deportees). You can ask the SCCM any questions about anything that you are unsure of or want to clarify. After the briefing, you collect your luggage, go through security and head for the crew transport to board the aircraft and start your safety and security checks onboard.<br /> <br /> <strong>Reducing errors </strong><br /> <br /> Pre-flight briefings are helpful for crew resource management and reducing errors and the potential for incidents during the flight. The brief importantly should build teamwork as so often we are flying with new colleagues and we work for long hours in close proximity, so it is useful to have that ‘synergy’. <br /> <br /> We also need to create a team spirit and have good leadership onboard the aircraft. All communication should be interactive and the workload should be fairly distributed for effective teamwork and to reduce errors. The briefing encourages good time management, prioritizing your workload and understanding your airlines SOP’s (Standard Operating Procedures).<br /> <br /> The service requirements need to be considered as well as unplanned events – always expect the unexpected! All in all, the pre-flight briefing is a critical element of the day for improving performance, increasing safety and security and making sure that your flight is a very successful one.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author:</strong> <br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. <br /> <br /> Recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/air_hostess_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.ar.jal.com/arl/region/en/other/career/">Japan Airlines</a> New technology and Cabin Crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/new-technology-and-cabin-crew/1160 cabincrew.com Thu, 12 Jun 2014 11:41:09 GMT The iPad can replace the passenger manifest or PIL and contains details of the passenger profile, their special meals and frequent flyer status. Previous flights and preferences can also be found. The device can also store timetables, seating plans and safety information that can be referenced during the flight. <br /> <br /> If a passenger is delayed for example and may miss his next flight, then it is possible for <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a> to look up alternative schedules and with passenger approval, send a message to the ground staff to rebook the passenger on a later flight. If there is internet access onboard the aircraft, emails can be sent for the immediate attention of the ground staff and we can offer quick solutions for service recovery and provide a better tailored service for our passengers.<br /> <br /> <strong>Replacing paperwork</strong><br /> The iPad can in theory replace much of the traditional paperwork including things like trip reports, passenger feedback forms and reports on unserviceable items or safety feedback. Flight records will also help to calculate accurately flight time limitations and flying allowances for cabin crew and flight crew. Accident and incident forms and flight audit forms can also be stored on the device, to report any issues or check things like passenger boarding time or catering standards. The turnaround time for dealing with any issues for both passengers and crew will become much quicker.<br /> <br /> <strong>Future developments</strong> <br /> In the future, cabin crew can be assessed with online forms and some cabin crew training can be studied anytime and anywhere, which is a huge bonus as we can see videos, manuals and take assessments on demand. Cabin crew manuals and reference guides will be stored via a ‘cloud’ without the need to carry our manuals with us. <br /> <br /> We can store checklists and inventories for the bar, catering and retail, as well as seeing how we can make the passenger service more tailored to their needs. The device can also be used as a ‘point of sale’ tool to perform inflight retail and offer payable upgrades.<br /> <br /> Another bonus to this new technology is that internal communication within the airline will be much easier as we will have instant access to news, updates and emails as soon as they are announced across the company. Previously this could be a problem, just because when we are constantly moving, we may only collect the information from our base on a weekly basis. <br /> <br /> <strong>All in all, the new ideas that this technology brings can only make our job easier and more efficient and that can only ever be a good thing!</strong><br /> <br /> <strong>About the author:</strong> <br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: Emirates What does it take to become a VIP Flight Attendant? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-does-it-take-to-become-a-vip-flight-attendant/1159 cabincrew.com Wed, 21 May 2014 12:12:04 GMT Working as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/vvip_cabin_crew_jobs/">VIP Flight Attendant</a> is a very unusual job in that the emphasis is more on the service and food than safety which can be difficult to adapt to for cabin crew who have worked on commercial aircraft. However, saying that I would say that that is still an advantage to know your safety and emergency procedures and learning about 5 star food presentation and service is fascinating and will improve your attention to detail.<br /> <br /> <strong>What is corporate aviation? </strong><br /> <br /> Corporate aviation is basically any company or individual that operates private jets for private or commercial use. They may own just one aircraft or they may have a whole series. Aircraft may be privately owned by an individual for their own private use or aircraft maybe chartered out to other clients or it can be a combination of the two. <br /> Some operators have their own base or FBO (fixed base operator) where they will have facilities such as flight operations, dispatch, catering assistance etc. Some aircraft will have their own fixed crew or some crew maybe contracted through the operator or occasionally freelancers will be used. <br /> <br /> <strong>Who are my passengers?</strong> <br /> <br /> Your passengers maybe royalty or government officials depending on the type of operator. You may also carry film stars, pop stars or sporting personalities if the aircraft is chartered. Most often you will be looking after high profile businessmen who can afford the luxury of hiring a private jet or who own it. Some billionaires, oligarchs or businessmen do own their own aircraft, so you may work for them and their family or business clients. <br /> <br /> <img src="https://www.corporateflighttraining.com/course_pictures/large/dreamstime_l_16022365.jpg" /><br /> <br /> Alternatively, if it is chartered regularly you could be working for any number of high profile clients. It is also culturally specific, in the US you are more likely to be working for businesses or billionaires, whereas in Russia, it will be for the oligarchs. In Saudi Arabia and the wider Middle East, it will be for the royal families and there are many! In Africa, it will mostly be for governments and leaders while in Europe, it will usually be high profile business men and their families.<br /> <br /> <strong>What aircraft will I work on?</strong><br /> <br /> Most private jets have between 6 and 15 seats but this is dependent on aircraft type and owner requirements. You may work on a light jet like a Learjet 45 which may only have 6 seats or something like a Challenger 300 which can have between 7 and 9 seats. Heavy jets can hold up to 15 passengers, the Global XRS and Gulfstream G550 being two of the most popular. Commercial airliners can also have VIP configuration – so you may find yourself on a Boeing 737 with only 40 seats and facilities such as an office, bedroom and bathroom.<br /> <br /> <strong>How can I be a VIP Flight Attendant?</strong><br /> <br /> It is a very niche industry and difficult to get in to and very different to commercial flying. It is also very restrictive in that the owner/operator may have their own list of requirements that could include language skills, age range and passport/visas held. Usually 2 years of business or first class flying experience is asked for as a bare minimum plus a preference for 5 star catering and hospitality knowledge. <br /> But once you make the transition to corporate flying an interesting and varied career awaits and I promise no 2 days will ever be the same.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> [URL=http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/]Browse cabin crew jobs on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today.[/URL] <br /> <br /> Photo: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.corporateflighttraining.com/">Corporate Flight Training</a> Pre-training for Cabin Crew: What you may need to learn http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/pre-training-for-cabin-crew-what-you-may-need-to-learn/1158 cabincrew.com Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:10:53 GMT This will save some time on your airline training course as well as showing your commitment to the course, so it’s best to study, you may have an exam during your first week! Here are a few brief examples of what you need to learn:<br /> <br /> <strong>Aircraft terminology </strong><br /> <br /> These are basic words and abbreviations that we use every day, so learning some can be a real help – it’s like a whole different language!<br /> <br /> AFT – back of cabin <br /> MID – centre of cabin <br /> FWD – forward of cabin <br /> Interphone – for communicating with crew and used for announcements <br /> Galley – where we prepare the meals<br /> Demo – short for safety demonstration <br /> A320 – aircraft type Airbus 320 <br /> B737 – aircraft type Boeing 737<br /> CPT – Captain, in charge of the aircraft<br /> FO – First Officer, second in command<br /> SCCM – Senior Cabin Crew Member<br /> Short haul - usually a flight between 1 and 3 hours<br /> Mid haul – A flight between 3 and 5 hours<br /> Long haul – A flight of 5 hours +<br /> Charter – a charter airline primarily deals with passengers travelling for leisure and have most routes during the summer to holiday destinations <br /> <br /> These are just a few examples, many more can be found online and may differ from airline to airline.<br /> <br /> <strong>The 24 hr clock</strong> <br /> <br /> We work with the 24hr hour clock in aviation, so it is very important to know it and understand it, it is sometimes also known as ‘military time’. Your roster and all briefing sheets/forms will use the 24 hour clock to avoid any confusion! It is also useful to know the terms UTC (co-ordinated universal time), GMT (Greenwich mean time) and ‘Zulu’ time, which are basically all the same thing! They are the ‘time standard’ used worldwide, so you may often hear down-route, for example, ‘’Report tomorrow at 13.00 Zulu’’ – which means if you are in New York, you have to report at 13.00 GMT (UK time, not USA time!) <br /> <br /> <strong>Airport Codes</strong><br /> <br /> Airport codes are very important to understand whilst working as cabin crew, but you will learn them as you go along! These will be used on your roster and briefing sheets too, so it is always useful to learn a few in advance – research the destinations you will be flying to and find their airport code online:<br /> <br /> <strong>Airport Codes </strong><br /> LHR – London Heathrow<br /> LAX – Los Angeles <br /> AMS – Amsterdam Schipol <br /> CDG – Charles de Gaulle Paris <br /> DXB – Dubai <br /> MCO – Orlando <br /> LGW – London Gatwick<br /> <br /> <strong>Phonetic Alphabet </strong><br /> <br /> English is the official language of aviation and is used worldwide. As some of the letters sound similar, the phonetic alphabet was introduced to make spoken language clearer. You will be surprised how much you use it!<br /> <br /> A Alpha <br /> B Bravo <br /> C Charlie <br /> D Delta <br /> E Echo <br /> F Foxtrot <br /> G Golf <br /> H Hotel…. Etc…<br /> <br /> <strong>Chain of Command </strong><br /> <br /> The ‘Chain of Command’ is crucial for each cabin crew member. The purpose of this is to secure the safety of the aircraft and all passengers and crew onboard as well as the efficient management of the airline operation. The Pilot/Captain has complete control of the aircraft and his order or command must be adhered to.<br /> Captain/Pilot in Command – First Officer/Co-pilot – Senior Cabin Crew Member- Cabin Crew Member<br /> <br /> I hope that this has given you a few pointers as to your pre-training course and will help you on the start of your new career path. Not all airlines send pre-training courses but many do to help prepare you for training as there is so much information to take in. <br /> <br /> Please note that these are guidelines only, the actual terms used by your new airline may be different! <br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">a series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today.<br /> <br /> Photo: Thomas Cook/Deeside College The History of Cabin Crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/the-history-of-cabin-crew/1157 cabincrew.com Tue, 25 Mar 2014 14:57:01 GMT You can be <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a> for an airline, a private jet or sometimes in the military. The origins of the ‘flight attendant’ or ‘air steward’ title is thought to have come from the maritime world and today is still seen in the airline career ladder in roles such as ‘purser’ or ‘chief steward’. But where did it all begin? Here we take a look…<br /> <br /> <strong>1920s, 1930s, 1940s</strong><br /> The first cabin crew member was reportedly Heinrich Kubis in 1912, who worked on a German Zeppelin. In the 1920’s Imperial Airways in the UK started to recruit cabin boys who could load luggage and reassure the passengers. In 1929, Pan Am in the USA were the first to have ‘stewards’ who served food. However, in the 1930’s Boeing Air Transport and registered nurse Ellen Church devised a scheme where nurses were hired for 3 months at a time to travel onboard and look after the passengers. During World War II, many of the nurses were enlisted into the armed forces, therefore the nursing requirement for ‘flight attendants’ changed.<br /> <br /> <strong>1950s and 1960s</strong><br /> Through the 50’s and 60’s, being a flight attendant was seen as a very elite profession but conditions were very strict – unmarried females only were accepted and overall appearance was very important. If you wanted to get married, you would have to give up your job. The uniforms were form fitting and often with hats, high heels and white gloves, so a certain glamorous reputation was always perceived. <br /> <br /> <img src="file:///X:/Public%20-%20Content%20Engine/Cabin%20Crew/Cabin%20Crew%20Lifestyle%20photo%20gallery/1950s%20Boeing%20interior.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <strong>1970s and beyond</strong><br /> Things started to change again in the 1970’s with the start of unions and equal rights between men and women. Ironically more man joined the profession during these times and it is seen less as just a female role.<br /> <br /> Nowadays, although appearance is still an important factor as <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a> are the face of the airline, rules are less restrictive regards age and height/ weight restrictions with weight being in proportion to height, being the general model. Tattoos that are visible are mostly unacceptable as airlines still want to keep a very prestigious image. <br /> <br /> Grooming standards and personal presentation are still very important and expected to remain at all times. Uniforms are designed not only to be durable and stylish (often top designers are hired) but to inspire confidence for the passengers, a long way from the original nurses uniforms of the 1930s! <br /> <br /> <strong>Post 9/11</strong><br /> Since 9/11 and tougher safety regulations, it is a more difficult job than it used to be and our role has become more challenging but the skills you learn you will appreciate for life… Unfortunately, the recent recession has called for many airlines to close down and contracts are often short term but the industry is struggling to find its feet again. Competition for every <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew job</a> is fierce and it is still one of the most difficult jobs to get! <br /> <br /> However, it is still an amazing job to do if you get the chance and you will never regret the experience.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse cabin crew jobs on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. Ten ways to make the most of your cabin crew career http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/ten-ways-to-make-the-most-of-your-cabin-crew-career/1156 cabincrew.com Mon, 17 Mar 2014 10:53:33 GMT You will find it becomes a lifestyle more than anything and you learn to juggle life to fit in, fast. But there are many ways to be creative and adapt, to further make the most of your career choice as <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a>.<br /> <br /> <strong>1. Enjoy the destinations</strong> - Not everyone can say they had lunch in Paris or dinner in Rome – all in a week! Or shopping in New York, for that matter… Make the most of your time down-route.<br /> <br /> <strong>2. Record precious memories</strong> - These times you will want to remember so record them, either by taking photos, writing a blog or writing in a journal. Once you stop flying, you will wish you did!<br /> <br /> <strong>3. Take care of each other</strong> - We work in such a small space and teamwork is crucial. It is easy to forget on a busy flight that in an emergency we are responsible for saving each other’s lives too. We are a family and there is always someone to turn to, in times of need. Use this network.<br /> <br /> <strong>4. Always resolve before the flight to ‘have a nice day out…’ </strong>- Leave issues and problems aside and it will make a long working day enjoyable and hopefully a little fun!<br /> <br /> <strong>5. When away from home, use the time to appreciate local food and culture</strong> – You will be amazed how much you learn and grow as an individual – travel certainly does broaden the mind.<br /> <br /> <strong>6. Look after yourself </strong>- The long hours and especially flying long haul can have a negative effect on your health long term. Make sure you drink plenty of water, eat light and well and get rest when you can. Fit in a little exercise too if you can, for an extra energy boost.<br /> <br /> <strong>7. Appreciate your friends</strong> – You will make amazing cabin crew friends during your career! Nurture them and your friendship will be lifelong and forever interesting. They will often be the ones who are there for you, as they understand the lifestyle!<br /> <br /> <strong>8. Learn something new</strong> – Use your career to learn basics of languages or take time out to study something different. This can give you a balance in your crew life as well as an external focus.<br /> <br /> <strong>9. Appreciate the journey!</strong> - Not many people get the chance to do the job of their dreams, so even on the ‘day from hell’, remember how hard you worked to get there.<br /> <br /> <strong>10. Cabin Crew are quite special characters and unique</strong> – We have to be able to be multi- skilled and multi-talented. So always be proud to be cabin crew!<br /> <br /> You may be cabin crew for just a few months or many years, but it will be the experience of a lifetime! There is a lot of hard work involved, but once you appreciate the lifestyle and learn how to adapt to it, you will find it much easier to make the very most of being cabin crew.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia has moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">a series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: lastingtime.tumblr.com The work-life balance – How Cabin Crew get it right! http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/the-work-life-balance-how-cabin-crew-get-it-right/1155 cabincrew.com Thu, 06 Mar 2014 13:20:45 GMT For many of us it becomes more of a lifestyle choice than anything but you also need to be flexible, organized and ready for anything. How can we make it easier? Here are a few ideas…<br /> <br /> Understand your schedule! You know that you may miss birthdays, Christmases and weddings – special family events – unfortunately it is part of the job and some people find that hard to accept. It does have its advantages though as sometimes, it is nice to be away with crew friends somewhere, especially if you are single. <br /> <br /> Family life can be a little more challenging for <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a>, although not impossible! You normally get your roster around 6 weeks in advance, so it gives you a little time to work around things, plan any appointments/events (although these may still change – unscheduled trip, aircraft technical problem and standby duty) and make sure if you do have something special coming up, try and book leave days to cover this as soon as you can. <br /> <br /> You may or may not get them, but it gives you a fighting chance. If you have young children, you may need to arrange childcare, school transport etc, so a supportive and flexible family are an absolute must! <br /> <br /> <strong>Plan ahead</strong><br /> Make sure your finances are in shape and put aside a day to make sure bills are paid in advance, any correspondence dealt with etc – then you don’t have to worry when you could be potentially away on trips. Any ‘chores’ that need doing, work out when your off days are and how you can schedule them into that time, also allowing for rest time, especially if you work on long haul flights. Sometimes it is actually possible to do some chores down route – shopping for one! If you plan well, you can buy things cheaper abroad or buy things you couldn’t normally buy elsewhere. Just don’t fill your suitcase too full!<br /> <br /> <strong>Look after yourself </strong><br /> This is something we often take for granted and forget to do. Flying constantly does put extra pressures on the body and it is good to try and counteract that. Make sure you get enough rest at home and down route. If you have time, make use of gym facilities or spa at the hotel or just go for a walk around town. <br /> <br /> Eat well and quite light as it will be much better for your digestion, which can be a problem when working long hours, irregular shifts and sometimes not the nicest food. Sometimes it is possible to bring your own food onboard, which will help you to feel healthier. Make sure you drink plenty of water both onboard and on the ground to help rehydrate the body.<br /> <br /> <strong>Don’t be lonely</strong><br /> Sometimes the flying life can feel lonely, especially when you are away a lot. So take a few little reminders from home with you – a photo of loved ones, a room spray that reminds you of home or any home comforts to make a bland hotel room feel more homely. Use skype to call friends or family and stay in contact…<br /> <br /> Remember it is ok to feel ‘tired and emotional’ sometimes (we all do…) and your colleagues will mostly be very supportive, as they know how difficult it can be. Don’t be afraid to ask for their help. Your good crew friends will probably be friends for life as they understand our lifestyle, so keep in touch when you can, it never matters how long it’s been…<br /> <br /> <strong>Time saver tip </strong><br /> Keep your suitcase packed and ready to go at all times – this will save you a lot of time and energy. Keep a separate toiletry bag/make up bag just for your suitcase and have the same clothes packed every time – basic items you can use for any occasion. All you need to do, is wash them and repack them after every trip. Safe trips and happy landings!<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. Do you speak our language? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/do-you-speak-our-language/1154 cabincrew.com Mon, 10 Feb 2014 13:20:49 GMT <strong>By Patricia Green</strong><br /> <br /> As a general rule, most cabin crew have to be able to speak English as that is the language that is used in aviation and is set by the authorities to create better crew communication and prevent potential incidents or accidents. For smaller regional airlines, English may not be used onboard and the local common language used. However, all safety and emergency procedures training and related items onboard the aircraft, should be in English. <br /> <br /> Near fluency or fluent is the preferred level of English for all <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/senior_cabin_crew_jobs/,">cabin crew,</a> so mis-communication should not occur. This is tested at your airline assessment day through written exam or oral exam with a native speaker – this can also apply to 2nd language speakers where certain languages are specifically asked for by the airline.<br /> <br /> <strong>What if you need to improve your English? </strong><br /> <br /> There are a few ways of doing this – there may be a course held locally that you can attend, for example, the British Council (in many capital cities around the world) holds regular English courses. You could also learn online or join a programme where you can use Skype and talk with an English speaker directly to practice your language skills. If you prefer to learn alone, there are some useful books with CD’s or CD roms entitled ‘English for Cabin Crew’ or ‘Aviation English’ – these can be found online. There are also specialised Aviation English courses and tutors available via the internet, if you wish to study in private with an individual.<br /> <br /> <strong>What other languages are preferred? </strong><br /> <br /> For large commercial airlines it will depend on what region you will be working, for example in Europe, French, German and Italian are often asked for as 2nd or 3rd languages. In the UK, English is obviously the most important but any 2nd European language is an advantage and if you have any language skills it is worth adding them to your CV, whether basic or conversational. In the Middle East, it is popular to recruit cabin crew with language skills, as they want to be multinational and almost always will have a native speaker on a flight, which can be very useful! Some of them also request Arabic speakers, but this will be specified on their careers page. <br /> <br /> For private jets and business aviation, Mandarin and Russian are the most requested languages, along with English fluency, because industry is booming in those regions and the private jet industry expanding. French can also be useful as it widely spoken in Africa for example and parts of the Middle East. If you want to learn another language there are many online courses (some for free) and more unusual techniques like the Earworms method, which involves learning language with music, for something a little different!<br /> <br /> <strong>Useful phrases onboard</strong><br /> <br /> As a side note, once you are cabin crew you may naturally pick up useful phrases onboard, when you travel regularly to different countries. It is something useful to learn as you go and shows a politeness towards your passengers, even if it’s just a ‘hello’ and ‘goodbye’ in their language – it will be appreciated. <br /> <br /> Apart from English, it is not essential to have another language, but it can be an advantage and is always useful to improve your CV in the future. Always check the airline’s career website for the requirements of their <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/senior_cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a>, it will state which languages they are looking for. Also, from time to time, this may change (eg. If they start a new route to a different country) they may recruit for language speakers from that region.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the Author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/senior_cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.austrian.com/">Austrian Airlines</a> Breaking down the Assessment Day: Tests for cabin crew http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/breaking-down-the-assessment-day-tests-for-cabin-crew/1153 cabincrew.com Mon, 03 Feb 2014 11:16:47 GMT I am often asked on the forum what are involved in these, so thought it would be helpful to cover them in more detail here! They are not there to be difficult or to trick you but to see if you have the basic knowledge skills that a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew member</a> needs. <br /> <br /> Tests do differ from airline to airline and the questions here are examples taken from different airlines over the last year. There are also a few simple tips I can give you - it is all in the preparation!<br /> <br /> <strong>The Reach Test</strong><br /> <br /> Firstly, there is the ‘reach test’ this is the first and most important as it is simply pass or fail as you have to be able to reach to 210 or 210 cm for most airlines. This is without shoes and allowed on tip toes with either one or both hands, fingertips reaching to the marker. <br /> <br /> You do need to be able to do this as you have to be able to reach the safety equipment onboard the aircraft in the overhead lockers. Do mark a point on the wall and practice reaching it – it is surprising how many people miss this opportunity by not realizing how important it is! Some airlines in Asia have a slightly lower reach test as do some of the regional airlines, depending on aircraft type, so these are worth considering if you cannot reach the marker.<br /> <br /> <strong>Maths Tests</strong><br /> <br /> The maths test always worries everyone but you don’t have to be a star maths pupil to survive it, just think practically. It will involve using basic maths in a cabin crew situation - so for example:<br /> • A meal cart fits 6 trays horizontally and 12 trays vertically, how many trays are there in the cart? <br /> • A passenger buys 2 coffees at 2.99 GBP and gives you 10.00 GBP, what change do you give? <br /> <br /> Also consider currency exchange (they will give you the rate... and you may get a calculator!) so with the last question: <br /> <br /> • What if they gave you 10 euro, what change would you give? The rate is 1.10.<br /> <br /> Basically, if you have passed your maths GCSE or equivalent as the requirements ask, then you will be fine!<br /> <br /> <strong>Language Tests</strong><br /> <br /> The English test used by some of the airlines in the Middle East is about an hour long. It does change and subjects will differ, but just as an idea of what to expect:<br /> <br /> Read a cabin crew story – you must answer 5 multiple choice questions about the story to check your understanding.<br /> • Match the task to text - this checks that you understand the meaning of words eg. reliable, considered etc. and phrases such as 'take it or leave it' for example. <br /> • Read a cover letter - answer 5 multiple choice questions about it<br /> • Essay - write about a specified subject. 'Who is your inspiration and why?', 'If I ruled a country, which country would I rule and why?' or 'What traits do you like or not like about yourself? How and why would you change them?'<br /> <br /> If you are worried about your English skills there are books and courses online that specialize in English for Cabin Crew, so it may be worth perfecting your fluency. The current standard for cabin crew in Aviation English is ICAO level 4, but you do not need a special qualification.<br /> <br /> Foreign language speakers may also be asked to complete a test in their alternate language to check fluency level, if they are being recruited for language skills. This is often an oral test with a recruiter who speaks your language.<br /> <br /> <strong>General Knowledge Tests</strong> <br /> <br /> Of course, no two airline tests are the same, so you can just use this as a basic guide for the assessment day. There may also be a general knowledge test which includes things like geography, airport codes, currency or the 24 hour clock. <br /> <br /> While you do not need to study any of these in detail, they will also be useful for your training once you get through. Do take a look too at the airlines route map (learn some airport codes…) and also research a little about the aircraft fleet and the airlines current product and history. This will really help you shine in your tests and show professional knowledge in the final interview stage.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the Author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> today. Breaking down the Assessment Day: Role play and group task http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/breaking-down-the-assessment-day-role-play-and-group-task/1152 cabincrew.com Wed, 22 Jan 2014 14:59:00 GMT <strong>By Patricia Green </strong><br /> <br /> These are important parts of the assessment day as the recruiters will be watching to see how you work within a team and as an individual, as well as assessing skills like leadership and listening. Some airlines have role play and group tasks and some just group tasks and discussions as part of the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew</a> selection process. Here we can look at them in a little more detail and find out what the recruiters are looking for. <br /> <br /> <strong>TOP TIP: This is where the majority of applicants will make mistakes and have to leave the assessment day, so it is your chance to show you have the right skill set for being cabin crew.</strong><br /> <br /> <strong>Role play</strong><br /> This is where the recruiters will be watching to see how you deal with challenges and unusual situations and is very important to the role of cabin crew. They may use an incident you could have onboard or in another job. It is up to you, to deal with the matter efficiently with initiative and most importantly, with a successful conclusion…<br /> <br /> Example 1: You are working in a restaurant and the angry customer says his meal is cold. What do you do? <br /> Apologize and be polite. Take the meal away and say you will get a new one from the kitchen as quickly as you can. Maybe offer him a free drink whilst he is waiting…. Worst case scenario, call for the supervisor for assistance.<br /> <br /> Example 2: A passenger complains that he doesn’t want to sit next to the family with children. What do you do? <br /> Apologize and be polite. Explain maybe there was a mix up at check in but not to worry, you’ll check the passenger list and see where you can find him a more suitable seat. Even better offer a choice of seats. It is not a good idea to talk about this in front of the family, so keep things discreet, they will be stressed enough as it is!<br /> <br /> <strong>Group task</strong><br /> The group task can vary widely at each assessment day, you may have to build a structure out of unusual items like straws and paperclips (!) or take part in an imagined scenario, like being stuck on a desert island. These show teamwork, initiative and communication – all vital skills of cabin crew.<br /> <br /> Example: You are survivors of a ship wreck, on a desert island. You have limited resources and little chance of escape, what should you do? Each person will be given an identity (eg. Mary, age 65, a grandmother or Sam and 18 year old student) and you have to work out a scenario to stay or go as given by your recruiters – they will give you clues. So you may have enough resources to build a life raft? They will then ask you to discuss why people should stay or go and why and also you may have to argue for your identity to stay or go! <br /> <br /> Do act fairly at all times and listen well to what everyone has to say… Work as a team and contribute to the scenario, bringing others in where you can. You may show a little leadership quality but not too much!<br /> <br /> <strong>Tips:</strong><br /> • Never speak over anyone else<br /> • Make sure you have equal time speaking to everyone else, don’t be too talkative but don’t remain silent<br /> • Use your initiative in the tasks to show you are thinking creatively<br /> • Try and bring in other members of the group to show teamwork – for example: ’ I agree with what John is saying but we could use your idea too.’<br /> • Watch what you say!<br /> • Do not use the word ‘no’ or say anything negative or put anyone down.<br /> <br /> <br /> Hopefully this quick guide to acting your role play and group task will give you a little more focus and direction in your next assessment day. Remember every assessment day is a learning curve, use your experience each time and the process will get easier. Good Luck!<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/about-me.html">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. Your January Job-Hunt Checklist http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/your-january-job-hunt-checklist/1151 cabincrew.com Mon, 06 Jan 2014 15:52:09 GMT It’s true that in recent years the cabin crew jobs market has been challenging and disheartening. But as we head into 2014, optimism abounds. There are jobs out there. Recruitment agencies reported that demand for staff grew at the fastest rate for 15 years in November 2013* so now is the ideal time to get out there and land your perfect job. Our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/job-prospects-for-cabin-crew-in-2014/1150">recent article</a> by cabin crew consultant Patricia Green shows where cabin crew opportunities can be found in the coming year. <br /> <br /> Eager jobseekers just have to look and work a bit harder sometimes, send in spotless applications, and try as many avenues as possible to find and impress employers. The key is to stay motivated and positive-minded, and never give up!<br /> Start by being sure of the kind of role that would suit you and your experience. You must be realistic here, and if necessary compete some extra training or work experience to ensure you have what it takes to get hired. Do plenty of work around which airlines might be hiring, and where jobs are advertised. Once you have perfected your CV you can leap into action.<br /> <br /> <strong>1. Target individual companies</strong><br /> Large firms will have corporate careers sites, or at least a careers page on their main website. So use these to find advertised vacancies, sign up to trainee schemes, or post your CV. Follow the company on Facebook and keep an eye on their plans to recruit.<br /> <br /> <strong>2. Attend careers events</strong> <br /> There are many careers fairs held around the country each year, and attending could be your key to job success. Search online to find out what’s happening near you, and make sure you research the relevant recruiter before you set out, so that you can impress when you visit their exhibition stands. This is where you can ask questions about opportunities, and hand out your perfectly presented CV. If you live in the South East of England, why not register for the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://simplyjobexpo.com/">Simply Jobs Expo</a> – a free careers event located at Gatwick on January 30. Recruiters attending include Tui Travel, EasyJet, Trailfinders, Inchcape, Sofitel Luxury Hotels and many more. <br /> <br /> <strong>3. Sign up to jobs boards</strong><br /> Today nearly ever career sector has a specialist jobs board – for instance <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.aviationjobsearch.com,">www.aviationjobsearch.com,</a> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.traveljobsearch.com,">www.traveljobsearch.com,</a> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> and <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.simplyhoteljobs.com.">www.simplyhoteljobs.com.</a> There are many more, and also large general job sites that are worth signing up to. Specialist jobs boards have great free services such as <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/job_seeker/">email alerts, and CV upload</a>. So it’s worth getting your CV in front of industry-specific recruiters and receiving the latest jobs by email.<br /> <br /> <strong>4. Scan the trade press and local papers</strong><br /> Traditionally this has been where job adverts have been placed, and although the web has become hugely important for job hunting, looking in industry publications and local papers can be a great way to hear of vacancies.<br /> <br /> <strong>5. Register with recruitment agencies</strong><br /> By registering with two or three recruitment agencies you extend your reach in the job market, and will benefit from CV and interview advice from qualified recruitment specialists. <br /> <br /> <strong>6. Network online and offline</strong><br /> Using social media you can learn about particular recruiting companies and keep up to date with their recruitment plans. By being active on LinkedIn Groups you might get noticed by firms who are looking for new talent, and following influential people on Twitter could help you too. Make sure your <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/cabincrewjobs?ref=hl">Facebook</a> profile shows you in a professional light! Don’t forget to use face-to-face networking – and make the most of jobs expos, trade events and careers fairs by talking to as many recruiters as possible, handing out your CV, and collecting useful contact information. Tell your friends and contacts that you are looking for a new job!<br /> <br /> <strong>7. Set yourself targets</strong><br /> Finally, set yourself weekly targets of new companies identified, job board activity and CVs sent. You will feel more motivated during the job hunt if you are achieving your targets!<br /> <br /> <h2>If you haven’t already, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://simplyjobexpo.com/eventbrite-registration/">register for free for the Simply Jobs Expo</a>, which is taking place on January 30, at Sofitel Gatwick. It’s your chance to meet recruiters including EasyJet, Tui Travel, Trailfinders, Sofitel Luxury Hotels and Enterprise Rent-a-Car.</h2> <br /> *Source: KPMG/REC Report on Jobs, December 2013, produced by Markit Economic Research, December 2013<br /> <br /> Browse our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> today on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a><br /> <br /> Photo: iStock Job prospects for cabin crew in 2014 http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/job-prospects-for-cabin-crew-in-2014/1150 cabincrew.com Thu, 02 Jan 2014 13:23:34 GMT It's also the case that some airlines are putting recruitment on hold entirely. This means that thousands of applications are being made for the existing cabin crew roles each month. For instance it’s been reported that <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.emirates.com/uk/english/">Emirates</a> alone receives over 15,000 cabin crew job applications per month. <br /> <br /> The charter airlines in the UK are recruiting seasonally and mostly on temporary contracts - it depends on operational requirements as to how many <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> they can recruit, so they continue to be cautious. In the USA the merger of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.americanairlines.co.uk/homePage.do?locale=en_GB">American Airlines</a> and US Airways has created the world’s largest airline. This means there could be an increase in potential recruitment, although initially there may be a slowdown while they co-join the current crew. So the challenge is still there, if you are looking for a cabin crew role, but for many it could be a slow start. <br /> <br /> <strong>Boom time for low cost airlines</strong><br /> One of the biggest areas of growth is the low cost charter airlines, whose routes, networks and passenger figures are booming. The likes of EasyJet and Ryanair in the UK are still progressing and continue to regularly recruit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">new cabin crew</a>. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.flydubai.com/">Fly Dubai</a> and Air Arabia are expanding their networks rapidly, so I believe these are ones to watch for new opportunities in the Middle East. In Europe, Norwegian, <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.flygermania.de/en/">Germania</a> and Vueling are also seeing a progression in route expansion and there will be plenty of potential there, within the next 3 to 6 months. <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.airasia.com/ot/en/about-us/flight-attendant.page">Air Asia</a> and its subsidiaries (such as Air Asia X and the new Air Asia India) are also quietly working towards future opportunities. These are certainly the airlines to look out for in South East Asia.<br /> <br /> <strong>Corporate aviation</strong><br /> Corporate aviation and roles flying on private jets have decreased considerably and the benefits have dropped by quite a large margin. However if you are looking for something new and challenging to forward your career in aviation, this is still a very exciting and interesting path to choose. The main factor in the decrease in positions available is that ‘cabin attendants’ are no longer required to be responsible for safety on the aircraft and aircraft owners/operators are cutting back by not having a cabin attendant onboard. Also, they can stipulate many conditions for the prospective employee by stating age limits, nationalities, language skills and culinary talent before considering their previous cabin crew responsibilities. So, if this is the role for you, be prepared to network hard and hope that you will be in the right place at the right time!<br /> <br /> All in all, opportunities for cabin crew in 2014 are changing in response to the economic crisis worldwide and long term positions may be hard to find. Look to the low cost charters worldwide for the best chances to find work as cabin crew, albeit temporary/seasonal contracts in some cases. <br /> <br /> Be prepared for a little uncertainty and caution, but be hopeful. This is a whole new generation in aviation and for most cabin crew, a change in the usual direction. The role will stay the same, but the environment is most certainly evolving!<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew, with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> today on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a><br /> <br /> Photo: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.flydubai.com/">flydubai</a> 10 Best Cabin Crew Videos of 2013 http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/10-best-cabin-crew-videos-of-2013/1149 cabincrew.com Wed, 11 Dec 2013 16:50:40 GMT <strong>Richard Branson cross-dressing as cabin crew </strong><br /> <br /> Never one to shy away from publicity, Richard Branson shaved his legs and wore drag in May, to hostess a flight to Kuala Lumpur after losing a bet to AirAsia bossTony Fernandes. This ITN video shows the man really does have many talents – including looking pretty hot with a beard/lipstick combo!<br /> <br /> <iframe width="450" height="300" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/hGJZSDBIo08?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Woman kicked off plane for singing Whitney Houston song (badly) </strong><br /> <br /> Published by YouTube on 13 May 2013, an American Airlines flight was forced to make an emergency landing and kick a woman off the plane after she refused to stop singing Whitney Houston's 'I Will Always Love You'. <br /> The unnamed woman was escorted off the plane in handcuffs, (still singing) after the LA to New York flight was diverted to Kansas City on Thursday, Metro reports.<br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kDnjA3j_v8g?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>I’m so Excited – Almodovar’s aviation-themed movie trailer</strong><br /> <br /> This is the trailer for I'm So Excited!, Pedro Almodovar's super-camp Spanish airline comedy (with appearances from Penelope Cruz and Antonio Banderas). The film was released in the UK in May this year. Thanks to YouTube and <br /> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.totalfilm.com">http://www.totalfilm.com</a><br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TPpgmXaGS-I?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Amazing on-board orchestra </strong><br /> <br /> In June a group from The Philadelphia Orchestra found itself delayed on the tarmac for three hours waiting for their flight from Beijing to Macao as part of the 2013 Residency & Fortieth Anniversary Tour of China. Rather than sit and get bored, a quartet of musicians decided to provide a "pop up" performance for the passengers. Pretty amazing considering they were packed in like sardines! <br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/dFhYPsgroMk?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>I believe I can fly! </strong><br /> <br /> Here’s the 6/9/13 from Vegas to Phoenix. According to a passenger who took this video: “Flight attendants leave us alone to our devices after 5 hours, 2 planes, no snacks, no water, no A/C. Two people passed out, two vomited, and to avoid a mutiny, the passengers banded together in song.”<br /> <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/gFKufS0OHKw?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> Song credit: R. Kelly. "I Believe I Can Fly"<br /> <br /> <strong>Confessions of a Hostie </strong><br /> <br /> A great trailer for the book Confessions of a Hostie. Author Danielle Hugh has been an international hostie for 20 years and has written two books about the hilarious and sometimes bizarre scenarios she has found herself in, in the line of duty. <br /> <br /> From badly behaved passengers to romantic encounters with the tech crew, as well as her tips about the shopping meccas of the world, Danielle takes her reader on a tour of the galley, the jumpseat and an endless string of hotel rooms. The trailer certainly reveals some home truths about this profession!<br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_Ev3SfIraB8?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Artwork shows how BA stocks a Jumbo</strong><br /> <br /> Ever wondered what it takes to get a jumbo jet off the ground? In April British Airways created a picture of the iconic aircraft, using a jumbo number of items from the aircraft to show the scale of its operation.<br /> <br /> From toilet rolls to teaspoons, British Airways loads thousands of individual items on to each jumbo jet before it takes to the skies. With a combined weight of 6,120 kg, the items have to be unloaded and re-loaded before every take-off.<br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PTU_sOWgKho?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Another day in Middle Earth: Air New Zealand</strong><br /> <br /> In Middle-earth, everyday tasks can reveal out of this world surprises and before you know it everything can turn a bit Hobbit-shaped! This Air New Zealand advert was launched in November 2013 to coincide with the worldwide premiere of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug in LA.<br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/C7q7WFMuxsg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Virgin America rock their safety message</strong><br /> <br /> Buckle up to get down said Virgin America in October 2013. They enlisted the help of Virgin Produced, Director Jon M. Chu, Choreographers Jamal Sims and Christopher Scott, Song & Lyrics by Todrick Hall, Composer/Producer Jean-yves "Jeeve" Ducornet, Virgin America teammates, and dance stars like Mike Song and Madd Chadd to give the safety video a new song and dance -- literally. From the exit doors to the oxygen masks, no seat belt was left unbuckled. Very cool.<br /> <br /> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DtyfiPIHsIg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> <strong>Attention to detail with Singapore Airline</strong><br /> <br /> A lovely new advert from Singapore Airlines hit our screens in September 2013- all about the lengths the airline goes to for customer comfort. <br /> <br /> Singapore Airlines says: "Traveling in true comfort. It starts with the finest material, handcrafted with care. It comes from experiencing an exclusive space designed with your needs in mind. Because we understand that thoughtful innovation always needs a human touch. It's just one of the lengths we go to, to make you feel at home."<br /> <br /> <iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/R8f1AWJkXX0?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /> Browse our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> vacancies today. The VIP/Corporate Flight Attendant guide to freelance work http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/the-vip-corporate-flight-attendant-guide-to-freelance-work/1145 cabincrew.com Tue, 10 Dec 2013 16:25:45 GMT After some time flying in the corporate world, you may consider the option to work freelance – this offers freedom to do other things and the potential to make good money for the right person. As in every job there are the good and the bad sides, so we will look at these in more detail. However, there are many other aspects also to consider.<br /> <br /> <strong>Upsides: Flexibility and freedom of freelance work</strong> <br /> <br /> The best thing about freelance work is the flexibility and the freedom, you choose when you want to work. The next good thing is that you can earn good money for your trips. If you decide to freelance then your rate could be anything from $150 - $450 US dollars per day – this really depends on how much experience you have, your training and your aircraft types.<br /> <br /> It may sound like a lot of money but you could be travelling 2 days to work on a one day trip and you may not work again after for some time. But if you get a few long trips – it can be very lucrative. Some owners prefer to hire freelancers just for long trips and the rest of the time they won’t have a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/cabin_crew_jobs/">flight attendant</a> on board as it is not a legal requirement on most private jets. <br /> <br /> Realistically, freelance works best if you are prepared to be on standby and leave for anywhere within a few hours notice and if you have a good contact network in the business. You do have to be extremely flexible and confident in your abilities too, as it may be an aircraft type you haven’t worked on before, in a country you don’t know and you still have to organize catering and leave within the next few hours…So preparation is key!<br /> <br /> <strong>Downsides: Uncertainly and quiet times</strong> <br /> <br /> The down side to freelance work is that jobs can sometimes be few and far between and you might not know when the next work will be. So often a back-up plan, some studies or alternative career might be in order. You also have to consider that you are liable for your own training costs (depending on the operator and country regulations if training is necessary for legalities) and for you to remain current on safety and emergency procedures and aviation first aid. You will not be covered by health or life insurance, so it is wise to have your own cover. You have to decide whether you can make freelance flying worthwhile to you.<br /> <br /> <strong>So, how to find freelance work? </strong><br /> <br /> There are aviation job websites and agencies worldwide that you can register with – however many jobs as a VIP flight attendant are never advertised and mostly are through word of mouth and who you know, so it is a good thing to keep networking with other crew members. Sometimes it can be that an agency will call you with a suitable position and ask you if you are interested and they will keep you on their database for future opportunities. It is often a good idea to send out CVs and photos ‘on spec’ too, to agencies and private aircraft operators as you never know who may see your CV... Often it is just a case of being in the right place at the right time… The corporate aviation world is quite small too, so word gets around and you may be headhunted, or just get lucky!<br /> <br /> Contract work can be a bridge between full time and freelance flying, in that you may just agree to do one months flying or three months flying. In this case you are usually salaried per month and receive a per diem (a per night payment). Accommodation, transport and health insurance are often provided in these cases. Contract work can often be very interesting too as you may travel to some more unusual destinations where only a short contract is advisable!<br /> <br /> A word of warning – When ever possible get a ‘contract’ or a written agreement between yourself and the potential employer before leaving the country, whether it s a one day trip or one month trip. It can be the case that payments suddenly change, the trip changes length or you find out you are working for free. Try and get a payment in advance if possible or arrange a schedule for payment. Be aware that anything can happen: If you have an accident, the operator will probably have no medical insurance coverage for you or you may find that your are working on an illegal visa or even entering a country where you need a different visa, which you may not have been informed of! Trips can and do go wrong sometimes, so do your research, check the small print (and have an adventure!) and enjoy the freedom freelance flying can bring.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/e-bookse-courses.html">series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. Dismissed or been made redundant from a cabin crew job? Check your legal position here http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/dismissed-or-been-made-redundant-from-a-cabin-crew-job-check-your-legal-position/1144 cabincrew.com Thu, 28 Nov 2013 09:50:58 GMT If one of these situations has occurred, it is crucial to understand the actual process of losing your job, say the experts at Contact Law. <br /> <br /> Normally in the aviation industry large scale redundancies are handled very carefully by the airlines - as has been the case with British Airways and Thomas Cook in recent years. In these situations there is normally lots of communication, union involvement and advice from the employer about what is happening. <br /> <br /> But isolated cases of dismissal and redundancy often leave individuals confused as to their rights, and what their future holds. <br /> <br /> Understanding your case could be the difference between being able to get another job quickly, getting compensation for your situation, or even being offered an alternative position and remaining in employment.<br /> <br /> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.contactlaw.co.uk/">Contact Law</a> has designed an easy-to-use flow chat - provided below - that gives you immediate information about what your rights are and what you should do next. <br /> <br /> So what is your situation? Start by clicking on the most relevant option below, and the flow chart will take you through the process of employment law. You will find out if you need to talk to someone about your situation. You may need to refresh the page for the flow chart to appear below or click here to access the same service <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://bit.ly/18nJsnd.">http://bit.ly/18nJsnd.</a> <br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> here. <br /> <br /> Contact Law works with more than 5,000 solicitors throughout the UK who can help individuals and businesses with any legal issue. This includes family, employment, litigation, commercial, personal injury, will and probate, immigration and conveyancing.<br /> <br /> <iframe src='http://www.contactlaw.co.uk/employtree/index.php' width="660px" height='450px'></iframe><br /> <br /> Photo: Thanks to RLHyde flickr A quick fix guide to telephone and video interviews http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/a-quick-fix-guide-to-telephone-and-video-interviews/1143 cabincrew.com Tue, 26 Nov 2013 16:05:20 GMT This is a bonus too for any potential <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> who may otherwise not get a chance, as they cannot travel a long distance to an open day or assessment day. <br /> <br /> It allows the recruitment team judge where potential candidates may be recruited from, for example if they need designated language speakers or nationalities. <br /> <br /> <strong>Improve your chances of success</strong><br /> They can pre screen candidates in advance and see if it would be worthwhile to set up an assessment day somewhere they may not usually travel to. So what can you do to improve your chances of success and hopefully leading onto an assessment day?<br /> <br /> • Prepare some answers in advance for typical <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> interview questions. For example, ‘Why do you think you would make good cabin crew?’ or ‘Why do you want to work for our airline?’<br /> <br /> • Practice your answers out loud and slowly at first until it sounds natural to you.<br /> <br /> • Have your application forms copied out ready for your reference as they will probably ask you questions about your customer service experience, so be ready.<br /> <br /> • They will want to check that you meet the general requirements for the role, so may ask you your height, how far you can swim and what languages you speak - even if that sounds obvious!<br /> <br /> • Before the scheduled interview, take some deep breaths to keep yourself calm and control nerves - remember that everyone gets scared, but you are prepared. Knowledge is power…<br /> <br /> <strong>How to handle video or Skype interviews</strong> <br /> Video or Skype interviews are now also being used by some airlines to offer additional screening before the assessment day procedure. So how can you make sure you are prepared for those? <br /> <br /> Firstly, check that you are somewhere quiet that has a reliable internet connection, so you don’t get cut off half way through, although these things still happen! Secondly prepare as above, but add these tips to your list:<br /> <br /> • Make sure that your background is quite plain, no distractions on the wall behind you!<br /> <br /> • Make sure you look presentable and smart, no one will want to interview you in pyjamas…<br /> <br /> • Watch your body language, no folding arms or fidgeting. Sit tall as if at an interview, no slouching.<br /> <br /> • Even if it feels silly, smile and hold eye contact with an imaginary person if you can’t see them, it really will help you focus and seem more relaxed. Practise!<br /> <br /> • Check the camera’s view if you have time, so you can see that you look the part.<br /> <br /> Be polite and courteous and try to avoid talking over the recruiter at any point, remember there may be a time delay too in the call, so allow extra time for that. Speak a little slower than you normally do and be clear in your speech. Try not to fill spaces with too many ‘ah’s’ or ‘but’ and do remember to breathe! Also be aware of culture and political correctness in what you say, you don’t want to be judged on a comment that may have come out wrong…<br /> <br /> Prepare well and you are well on your way to passing the cabin crew telephone or video interview and heading on to the assessment day.<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/e-bookse-courses.html">E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. What happens at a British Airways assessment day? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-happens-at-a-british-airways-assessment-day/1142 cabincrew.com Fri, 15 Nov 2013 12:31:26 GMT If you have not yet begun you cabin crew career, you’re bound to be nervous when it comes to applying for jobs and getting interviews. So we've considered how to help ease the pressure, and decided to share the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.britishairways.com/travel/home/public/en_gb">British Airways</a> assessment day process with you all. <br /> <br /> The following is taken from one future cabin crew’s experience, so bear in mind that if you’ve applied to work for BA yours may be a little different. <br /> <br /> This assessment day began in the morning and the first few assessments were:<br /> <br /> • The reach test – this is conducted for health and safety purposes to make sure you can reach the overhead lockers and other parts of the aircraft comfortably without endangering yourself and your passengers.<br /> <br /> • Height measurement.<br /> <br /> • You will also be asked to sit in a crew seat and to adopt the brace position – you will be shown how to do this. <br /> <br /> • You will also have your passport checked. <br /> <br /> After these basic assessments are done you will be asked to complete a multiple choice questionnaire on flight safety and security – there are fifteen questions to complete. We were told by a successful candidate that most of these questions just require a little common sense – no heavy revision needed but make sure you understand basic safety procedures for an aircraft. <br /> <br /> You will then be separated into groups for rotational activities and interviews – this makes the day easier to conduct for the organisers and makes sure you’re not sitting around having to wait for ages! Once split into groups you can expect the following: <br /> <br /> <strong>• Group discussion:</strong> This exercise will last around 25 minutes and it is important to make sure that your voice is heard – but don’t drown out the voice of others, be respectful of everyone’s ideas as well as your own. The activities in the group discussion will vary but the example we have is of the group having to design a uniform for a ‘fun’ company, you will be fully briefed on what the expectations of this section are. <br /> <br /> <strong>• Role play:</strong> The role play section is very important and is your chance to demonstrate how you would respond in certain real-life scenarios such as dealing with a passenger who is making complaints. It is important that you take this part seriously and try to resolve the situation for the passenger whilst remaining apologetic and calm. <br /> <br /> <strong>• Passenger Announcement:</strong> You will be asked to make a passenger announcement as you will have often heard coming from cabin crew members on a flight. You will be given a script to read from so don’t panic – just make sure your voice sounds engaging and enthusiastic. <br /> <br /> <strong>• Personal Interview:</strong> The final stage of the assessment day will be your two to one interview – you will be asked a series of questions about how you would deal with certain scenarios such as an angry customer, and also why you want to work for British Airways, why British Airways should choose you – and other standard interview questions. This interview may last around 40 minutes so make sure you have something to say! <br /> <br /> The only thing left to do after that is the administration – you will have to fill in a few forms for reference purposes, and have all of your details checked again such as your National Insurance number and passport. <br /> <br /> Remember that the above may vary for each assessment day – and good luck!<br /> <br /> Browse our <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew vacancies</a> today on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> What must a VIP Cabin Crew CV include? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-must-a-vip-cabin-crew-cv-include/1141 cabincrew.com Tue, 12 Nov 2013 10:07:08 GMT When a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/jobs/vvip_cabin_crew_jobs/">VIP Cabin Crew</a> job is advertised, they will often not even read anything sent after the first day as the response is always overwhelming, so you have to be fast! Sometimes the <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">Chief Flight Attendant or Crew Manager</a> will only look at the first 10 or 20. <br /> <br /> They may only have 30 seconds to scan over your CV, so make sure the important things stand out. Impress them, with a clean professional looking CV and photo. Try and put a small professional head and shoulders shot of yourself on there too and keep it short 2 pages maximum. <br /> <br /> Make sure all your airline experience is near the top so they see that and the aircraft types that you have worked on. Don’t forget to add, if you were also a purser, senior crew member, trainer etc. Also add any special skills that you have that would be appropriate for example: speaking Russian or Mandarin (very popular now!) or if you have any catering experience and first class experience. <br /> <br /> Please add things like crew visas, passport type, flight attendant licenses and the last initial/recurrent training that you did. In some cases you may also be asked to send a full length photo, passport copy and license copies or certificates of initial training, so it is worth having them to hand, so they can take your application further. <br /> <br /> You may also be asked to provide references at a later stage and you can state on your CV if you wish, ‘references are available on request’. All of these tips should help your CV get noticed! Finally, remember to make sure everything is VIP appropriate and tailor your CV to make sure you are exactly who they are looking for!<br /> <br /> <strong>Here's a VIP Cabin Crew CV template to give you a starting point when writing yours: </strong><br /> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <br /> <strong><h2>Ann Other</h2></strong><br /> <br /> <strong>12 High Tree St, London, UK SW1 NVQ</strong><br /> <br /> Home: +44 206 777 6666 <br /> Mobile: +44 777 557733 <br /> E-Mail: <a href="mailto:annother@notmail.com">annother@notmail.com</a><br /> <br /> <strong>Objective:</strong><br /> <br /> Enthusiastic, hard working professional with excellent customer service skills looking for new opportunities within corporate aviation and to build on the experienced cabin crew role.<br /> <br /> <strong>Skills:</strong><br /> <br /> • Flexible and adaptable to any given situation, often at a moments notice.<br /> • Team worker but can also work on own initiative.<br /> • Professional image and excellent timekeeping.<br /> • Passion and commitment for providing customer service excellence.<br /> • Learns quickly and accepts new challenges readily.<br /> <br /> <strong>Profile:</strong><br /> <br /> Proficient cabin crew member of 4 years with experience of working in economy, business class and first class. European experience but wishing to relocate and work in the Middle East to understand more about the culture.<br /> <br /> <strong>Training:</strong><br /> <br /> Flight Attendant Training (LGW) Certificate of Completion, April, 2012 <br /> Hotel and Restaurant Manager (London University) Diploma, October 2005<br /> <br /> <strong>Aircraft types:</strong><br /> <br /> A319, A320, B757<br /> <br /> <strong>Professional Experience:</strong><br /> <br /> Cabin Crew at High Fly Airlines (UK) 2009 to present <br /> Providing the best service and safety standards on European short haul scheduled flights within economy, business and first class.<br /> <br /> Personal Assistant for VIP (UK) 2007- 2009<br /> All aspects of running day to day life of high profile individual including organizing meetings, schedules and organizing transport and hotel bookings.<br /> <br /> Receptionist at Savoyard Hotel (UK) 2003-2007<br /> Front of house operations for popular busy hotel including dealing with customer requests and complaints, checking in guests and dealing with admin and finance.<br /> <br /> <strong>Languages:</strong><br /> <br /> Fluent English, Basic French and German.<br /> <br /> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Cabin Crew Consultant</a>. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. What must a Cabin Crew CV include? http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/what-must-a-cabin-crew-cv-include/1140 cabincrew.com Thu, 07 Nov 2013 15:28:02 GMT Use your education and work experience to sell yourself and make the employer want to interview you and can see just how great you would be for the job. Add any tasks that you have done at work that may be appropriate to the role of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> – dealing with the public, handling cash, administration, food service etc. <br /> <br /> Also consider adding things like, ‘I have worked as part of a team’, ‘I am used to working unsocial hours’ or ‘I am very adaptable and am used to changing circumstances very quickly’, but only if you have done so! Languages, First Aid and volunteer work are also good skills to add, if this is something you have evidence of. <br /> <br /> Keep it quite short as the recruiters do not have long to scan over your CV. You can add a photo on your CV, if you wish, but it is not essential as you already have your photos in the application.<br /> <br /> Your photograph is very important too and could make or break your application immediately. Never send a holiday photo or photo with friends for example, as these will be discarded immediately. Think of what the recruiters are looking for – polished, immaculate looking and professional crew members. So, that’s half the job there just with your photograph, so make it a good one! <br /> <br /> Wear business wear and look like you are crew already. If you are not sure find some photos of cabin crew and try to copy their look. If possible have a professional photo done, this can be done cheaply and you only need a handful, not a whole photo shoot. Ask the photographer for a head and shoulders shot and a full length photo as that is what you will need. <br /> <br /> Finally, for the head and shoulders shot, try and smile a little (look friendly!) and for the full length photo, don’t slouch – imagine yourself at the aircraft door welcoming your passengers. Hopefully now armed with your professional looking photos and perfectly tailored CV, you can improve your chances of getting your cabin crew job.<br /> <br /> <strong>Here’s a useful Cabin Crew CV template to get you started: </strong><br /> <br /> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <h2><strong>Ann Other</strong></h2> <br /> 12 High Tree St, London, UK SW1 NVQ<br /> Home: +44 206 777 6666, Mobile: +44 777 557733, <br /> E-Mail: <a href="mailto:annother@notmail.com">annother@notmail.com</a><br /> <br /> <strong>OBJECTIVE</strong><br /> To gain a Cabin Crew job using my customer service skills and bring teamwork, communication and enthusiasm to the cabin crew role. <br /> <br /> <strong>EXPERIENCE </strong><br /> I have over 5 years experience in customer service in retail, catering and tourism environments. Working in such varied sectors has given me skills useful to the position of cabin crew, such as patience, diplomacy and flexibility. I also have worked in tourism, so understand some of the challenges of the position as well as having a good knowledge of geography, airlines and airports. In my free time, I volunteered abroad in a school in South America for 3 months which broadened my horizons as well as improved my language skills and respect for local culture.<br /> <br /> <strong>EMPLOYMENT</strong><br /> <br /> Travel Agent, Go Places, Luton 2010 to present<br /> Dealing with customer bookings, taking payments and offering travel advice as required.<br /> <br /> Waitress, Starbucks, Luton 2009 – 2010<br /> Service of food and beverages in a busy teamwork environment. First Aider.<br /> <br /> Retail Assistant, Next, Luton 2008 – 2009<br /> Taking payment for goods, dealing with customers and restocking and counting stock.<br /> <br /> <strong>EDUCATION</strong><br /> Sanford High School, 10 GCSE’s including Maths, English and French <br /> Langley College, Tourism and Travel Diploma<br /> Balleytine College, First Aid Certificate<br /> Balleytine College, Conversational Spanish<br /> <br /> <strong>PERSONAL</strong><br /> Excellent health, non-smoker, UK passport.<br /> <br /> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/e-bookse-courses.html">a series of E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today. <br /> <br /> Photo: CV writing by the Italian Voice on flickr Staying safe on your trip http://www.cabincrew.com/career-advice/staying-safe-on-your-trip/1138 cabincrew.com Mon, 14 Oct 2013 16:37:25 GMT <strong>From the airport</strong><br /> While in uniform when you are at the airport, always watch your luggage and crew bag, as someone may steal something from them. This could happen at the airport or at the hotel, so keep an eye on those bags. Always stay with your <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">crew</a> at the airport and don’t wander off. This is not just for security but also the ‘uniform standard’. In some countries, there maybe necessary measures taken to stay safe during your journey on the crew bus from the airport to the hotel - this may mean closing all window curtains so no-one can see who is on the bus and sometimes having an armed guard onboard!<br /> <br /> <strong>At the hotel</strong><br /> Once you are at the hotel and go to your room, prop the door open with your suitcase make sure there is no one behind you and check your room - make sure there is no-one hiding there. Check under the bed, the wardrobe and in the bathroom/shower. If a stranger gets into your room with a key card report it immediately to reception. One way to prevent this is to buy a small plastic door wedge that will stop the door opening – but remember you must be able to find it to get out in an emergency! Use all door locks whilst you are sleeping. Do take a look to see where you nearest emergency exit is, in case of fire and any special instructions for example, what to do in an earthquake. Luckily, in most hotels <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew</a> stay in rooms next to each other, so it is much safer for everyone and you should never feel isolated. At reception, take the hotel room numbers of a few of your crew members, so you can stay in touch and report any issues - some hotels will provide you with a crew list and room numbers. <br /> <br /> <strong>Out and About</strong><br /> Even when you are out and about - locals will know that you are crew even if you are not in uniform! They will see a bunch of people of the same nationality and accents and probably in the same places… they will often know what days crew will be there and what time… and this is not always a good thing. From personal experience, I was talking to a market trader in the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul - a market that thousands of people pass through every day. He said he thought we had more money and could afford a higher price for the items. I asked him why, he said ‘Because you are with..... airline!’ ‘How do you know?’ I asked. He explained that about the same time of day, almost every day 3 or 4 girls would be together looking for gifts and they always had the same earrings, even though the faces were different… And of course he was right about the airline - but not that we were rich like he thought!<br /> <br /> Taxis can be a problem is some countries so always set a price before you leave or if it is metered (these can be fixed though) ask for a price he thinks it will be. If possible try not to travel alone in a taxi, unless you are confident about it. <br /> <br /> Sometimes, they may say the meter is not working or something and try and charge you extra. Another scam is that he will change a note in his hand and insist you gave him a smaller note, so watch what money you are handing over.<br /> <br /> Finally, many crew do like to go out and have a few drinks after their flight - again in some places we become recognizable as crew and may become a target for drink spiking, so do watch your drinks and if you don’t feel well, tell the crew immediately and they will get you back to the hotel. This is essential, as it can be reported to all crew that maybe they should not go to xxx bar as this has taken place.<br /> <br /> Now, you know what to look out for - stay safe and have fun!<br /> <br /> <strong>About the author: </strong><br /> <br /> <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">Patricia Green</a> has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. <br /> <br /> She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/my-shop.html">E-books</a> to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.<br /> <br /> For more information please visit <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com/">www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com</a><br /> <br /> Browse <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://jobs.cabincrew.com/">cabin crew jobs</a> on <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.cabincrew.com">www.cabincrew.com</a> today.<br /> <br /> Photo: Air France